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McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology Seminar & Workshop, November 9 & 11, The Coach House, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 11/02/2015 - 11:20am

New Coach Hose

Monday Night Seminar – On Being: Future(s): Where is belief and meaning in the rapidly changing digital world?

With Mark Kingwell and Mathew Ingram 
Monday, November 9, 6:00 pm to 8:00 PM

Location: The Coach House, 39A Queen’s Park Crescent, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto

MARK KINGWELL is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto and a contributing editor of Harper’s Magazine in New York. He is the author or co-author of seventeen books of political, cultural and aesthetic theory, including the national bestsellers Better Living (1998), The World We Want (2000), Concrete Reveries (2008), and Glenn Gould (2009). In addition to many scholarly articles, his writing has appeared in more than 40 mainstream publications. Professor Kingwell’s last book was a collection of essays on politics, Unruly Voices
(2012); a new collection of his essays, Measure Yourself Against the Earth, appeared in October 2015.

MATHEW INGRAM is a senior writer at Fortune magazine, where he writes about the evolution of media and the social Web. Until March of 2015 he was a senior writer at Gigaom.com, one of the leading technology blog networks in the United States, based in San Francisco and
founded in 2006 by former Forbes and Business 2.0 writer Om Malik. He writes about the evolution of media and content and all that involves, including social media, Google, and the web in general — plus anything else that comes along. Up until January 2010, he worked for The Globe and Mail, a daily national newspaper based in Toronto.
Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

*****

Workshop: The Case of the Surplus Music

Wenesday, November 11, 2:00pm to 6:00 pm

Sandy Pearlman, McLuhan Centenary Fellow & Don McLean, University of Toronto
The Fatal Interface Shock Resulting, Some Object Lessons in the Transition From An Analog to a Digital Value System. “On the one hand information wants to be expensive…On the other hand, information wants to be free…,” Brand’s Paradox, originally stated by Stewart Brand to Steve Wozniak (1984).

Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

*****

New Explorations Group

Wednesday 11 November, 7:00-9:00 pm
Modes of Consciousness & Training in Sensibility

How can (or should) we abandon concepts in order to take the Real full in the face? Can we steal or borrow or put on McLuhan’s Jedi erceptual ability? Suggested readings/viewings: War and Peace in the Global Village (1968) by Marshall McLuhan “Education as a Training of the Senses: McLuhan’s Pedagogical Enterprise” by Norm Friesen (a pdf of the latter can be downloaded from: http://enculturation.net/education-as-a-training

Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

 

 

 

 


Categories: Blog

The 17th Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association Extended Call for Papers

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 11/01/2015 - 7:07pm

panoramic view of Bologna by Steffan Brinkmann

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO DECEMBER 1, 2015 
Interfaces of Play and Game: Engaging Media Ecosystems
June 23-26, 2016
University of Bologna
Bologna, Italy

MEA Convention Coordinators: Paolo Granata, Elena Lamberti, Brett Lunceford
UNIBO Coordinators: Roberto Farnè, Mirco Dondi

The University of Bologna, Italy, is proud to bring the Media Ecology Association to Europe for the first time and host the 17th Annual Convention in Bologna and Rimini on June 23-26, 2016. Considered the oldest university in the Western world, the history of the University of Bologna speaks to its role as the crossroads of a variety of scholarly traditions and changes involving the broader society. The University of Bologna provides a welcoming setting for old and new MEA members, inviting scholars, professionals, and interested people to attend from different fields, as well as from different nations.

The 17th Annual Convention, focusing on the theme “Interfaces of Play and Game,” invites papers, panels and creative projects exploring the topic within complex media ecosystems. We encourage participants to start from an appreciation of game and play in the broader context of media ecology, therefore overcoming too specialized understanding of both terms. Playing with Johan Huizinga’s idea that game and play are older than culture, we seek to recall the multifaceted symbolic dimensions embedded by these very terms: at its roots the word game means participation, communion, and people together; similarly, the word play introduces the ideas of cultivating, taking care of, and performing. Therefore interfaces of play and game engage us in a plurality of explorations, all placing media and media environments at the core. Lines of investigations may include but are not limited to the following:

· game/play as frames for meta-communication
· game/play as rituals
· game/play as strategies for storytelling
· game/play as self/meta-representations
· game/play as entertainment
· game/play as educational strategies
· game/play as system and complexity theories

Although we encourage submissions that touch upon or align with the convention theme, papers, abstracts, and panel proposal submissions from all areas of Media Ecology are welcome. A maximum of two submissions per author will be accepted. Authors who wish their papers to be considered for the Top Paper or Top Student Paper award must indicate this on their submission(s). The top papers will be published in Explorations in Media Ecology. All submissions will be acknowledged. The language of the convention is English.

Guidelines for Submission (Deadline extended to December 1, 2015)
Please submit all papers, panels, and proposals to https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=mea2016

For Manuscripts (for MEA award submissions):  
1. Manuscripts should be 4,000-6,000 words (approximately 15 to 25 double-spaced pages).
2. Include a cover page (or e-submission page) with your academic or professional affiliation and other contact information.
3. Include a 150 word abstract, with the title. Use APA, MLA, or Chicago style.
4. Papers should be written in English.

For Paper and Panel Proposals:
1. Include title, abstract, and contact information with your proposal.
2. Outline, as relevant, how your paper or panel will fit with the convention theme.
3. Presenters should be prepared to deliver their papers in English.
4. Authors with papers submitted as part of a panel proposal or as a paper proposal that wish to be considered for Top Paper or Top Student Paper must send completed paper to the convention planner by June 1, 2016.

Inquiries: Contact the Convention Coordinators at MEA2016@unibo.it. For specific questions about paper and panel submissions, contact Brett Lunceford at brettlunceford@gmail.com.

Convention Venues and Location:
The University of Bologna has adopted a multicampus structure in order to permit the diffusion of educational offerings, foster research activity, and improve the functionality and quality of university community life. The MEA convention will be hosted by the University of Bologna at:
· LILEC (Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures) – UNIBO Main Campus (www.lingue.unibo.it);
· DISCI (Department of History and Culture) – UNIBO Main Campus (www.storia-culture-civilta.unibo.it)
· QUVI (Department for Life Quality Studies) – UNIBO Rimini Campus (www.scienzequalitavita.unibo.it)

The University of Bologna is a city university, with the main campus in downtown Bologna. All facilities can be reached on foot easily from any hotels or university residency. We envisage a dedicated shuttle to bring MEA Convention participants from Bologna to Rimini and back. The City of Bologna and the City of Rimini will co-promote the Convention.

Travel to the Convention: 
Even though there are no direct flights from North America (with some exceptions in the summer, especially from NYC), the Bologna international airport is well connected to major European hubs (several daily flights to all EU hubs and capital cities). The Railway station in Bologna is connected to all main Italian cities, hourly (e.g.: 1,05 hour to Milan; 37 minutes to Florence; 2,05 hours to Rome).

Leisure time / Excursions: 
Bologna is at the crossroad of many possibilities: MEA participants could easily reach many different Italian historical places by public means of transport (Florence, Venice, Rome, Milan, Ravenna, etc.). This opens up many possibilities for extended stays. Similarly, from Bologna it is possible to organise short trips (about 30 minutes), also by train or bus, to such renowned cities as Ferrara (city of Bassani’s The Garden of the Finzi Contini and of Lucrezia Borgia) or Modena (city of the Ferrari team).

Bologna Tour: 
We would be happy to plan special guided tours within the city of Bologna, including:
· University Collections (Bologna was the home city of Galvani, Aldrovandi, Marconi, and many other illustrious men and women of science and art; the University collections include memorabilia from various historical times).
· Historical places (The “Seven Churches” and other Cathedrals; Giorgio Morandi’s studio and museum collection; The Anatomical theatre of the Archiginnasio, etc.).
· Museums (as diverse as: Museum of Music; Museum of the City of Bologna; Museum of contemporary Art; Ducati Motors Museum; Pinacoteca Nazionale, etc.).

For more information about the convention, please contact the Convention Coordinators at MEA2016@unibo.it. For more information on the Media Ecology Association and updated convention details, visit www.media-ecology.org. Convention information is also available at https://events.unibo.it/mea2016.

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Categories: Blog

Invitation to a Book launch for Two New Books by Dr. Eric McLuhan, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 10/30/2015 - 5:23pm

The McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology is please to announce an important launch of two new books written by Eric McLuhan, son and intellectual partner of Marshall McLuhan: Sensus Communis  and Cynic Satire.

Date & Time: November 6, 2017 at 7:00 PM

Place: The McLuhan Centre, 39A Queens Park Crescent, University of Toronto

(free parking available off 121 St. Joseph St.).

Author, journalist and McLuhan biographer Philip Marchand, and Francesco Guardiani, professor at the University of Toronto, Department of Italian Studies, will interact with the author Eric McLuhan in the very coach house where Marshall McLuhan and his son held court.

Sensus Communis

The Sensus Communis, Synesthesia, and the Soul: An Odyssey
BPS Books, Toronto, 2015

In this essay of extraordinary scope and depth, Eric McLuhan explores faith as a form of knowing. He does so against the backdrop of preliterate man’s concrete, bodily submersion in the putting on of poetry and drama (the practice of mimesis) and post-literate man’s bodiless submersion in electronic communication, in which sender and receiver are everywhere and nowhere at once. In traversing the Aristotelian and Medieval concept of sensus communis, he examines synesthesia as, in effect, its operating system and charts the modern and contemporary mandate to embrace the discarnate. He washes up on the shore of religion as he uncovers a trinity of knowledge, that is, three kinds of sensus communis – the five physical senses, the four intellectual senses of Scripture (historical, allegorical, tropological, and anagogical), and the three theological senses (faith, hope, and charity)-each of the three complete in itself yet interacting with one another. A fascinating odyssey that will dazzle the senses.

Cynic Satire

Cynic Satire
Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Newcastle upon Tyne UK, 2015

A Menippean – Cynic – satire is a device for producing a specific kind of effect on the reader. Menippean satire is an active form, not a passive one: any work that produces the effect of a Menippean satire is a Menippean satire. It is the embodiment of a Cynic – of a Diogenes or a Menippus or a Lucian or a Rabelais. For centuries, it has frustrated the best efforts of critics to define it. Descriptive criteria (such as “a mixture of verse and prose”) invariably fail because the form is determinedly fluid and polymorphous, and playful: it shifts its mode of attack with every change in culture or perception. Menippists plagiarize with abandon, from anyone and any period and culture. McLuhan has found a new and potent method of coming to grips with the satires by examining their interaction with the audience: the satire does what a Cynic would, were he or she physically present. This approach accounts for every shift in technique, from the most ancient (Homer composed one, the Margites) to tomorrow afternoon, and also opens the discussion of Menippism in any and all media other than literature – TV, digital, film, radio, et al. The book ends with a litmus test for detecting Menippean satires. It is also lavishly illustrated with title pages of some of the most notorious examples in the tradition, and is ideal as a textbook for undergraduates.

Eric McLuhan received his B. Sc. in Communication from Wisconsin State University in 1972. He got the M. A. and    Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Dallas in 1980 and 1982. An internationally-known lecturer on communication and media, he has over forty years’ teaching experience in subjects ranging from highspeed reading techniques to English literature, media, and communication theory, and has taught at many colleges and universities in both the United States and Canada.
He has published articles in magazines and professional journals since 1964 on media, perception, and literature, and assisted Marshall McLuhan with the research and writing of The Medium is the Massage, War and Peace in the Global Village, Culture is Our Business, From Cliché to Archetype, and Take Today: The Executive as Drop-Out. He is co-author: with Marshall McLuhan and Kathryn Hutchon, of City as Classroom (Irwin, 1977); with Marshall McLuhan, of Laws of Media: The New Science (University of Toronto Press, 1988); and with Wayne Constantineau, of The Human Equation (Toronto: BPS Books, 2010).
Eric McLuhan is the author of The Role of Thunder in Finnegans Wake (University of Toronto Press, 1997); Electric Language: Understanding the Present (Stoddart, 1998); and Theories of Communication (New York: Peter Lang, 2010). He is the co-editor of: Essential McLuhan (Stoddart, 1995), and Who Was Marshall McLuhan? (1994; Stoddart, 1995), and the editor of: The Medium and the Light (Stoddart, 1999); the academic journal, McLuhan Studies; and editor, for Gingko Press, of: Understanding Media, Critical Edition (2003); McLuhan Unbound (2004); and The Book of Probes (2004), and was consulting editor for Voyager/Southam’s “McLuhan Project,” which producedUnderstanding McLuhan (1997), a CD on Marshall McLuhan and his work. (Source: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/eric-mcluhan-book-launch/)


Categories: Blog

The Launch of the New McLuhan Program, Oct. 20, 2015: A Review by Andrey Mir

McLuhan Galaxy - Thu, 10/29/2015 - 12:25pm
Celebrating re-launch of McLuhan’s Coach House activity in the 21 Century For those deep in media study, the Coach House has always been a place of force. On October 20th, 2015, the McLuhans and Mcluhanists gathered in the Coach House, at the University of Toronto, to revitalize the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology for the 21st century.This name was initially used just on “a card pinned to the door of Marshall McLuhan’s office in the English Department”, back in 1963, as Wikipedia witnesses. Here is a brief history of the Centre for Culture and Technology, better known as the Coach House:“In the early 1950s, McLuhan began the Communication and Culture seminars, funded by the Ford Foundation, at the University of Toronto. As his reputation grew, he received a growing number of offers from other universities and, to keep him, the university created the Centre for Culture and Technology in 1963… McLuhan remained at the University of Toronto through 1979, spending much of this time as head of his Centre for Culture and Technology…”

“It then had no organized program for research or teaching, but gained in prestige from the world-wide popularity of Understanding Media (1964) and grew in McLuhan’s last decade in Toronto, assisted by Derrick de Kerckhove and McLuhan’s son Eric, who became a director of the McLuhan Program International. In 1994, the McLuhan Program became a part of the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information. The program’s curriculum is based on the works of Marshall McLuhan and other media theorists. In 2009, the Faculty of Information launched the Coach House Institute (CHI) as a clearly defined research unit under which the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology now operates.”

So, for now, this article of Wikipedia has become obsolete. This October, the Coach House got back its historical title: the Centre for Culture and Technology (not the McLuhan Program anymore).

Yes, when I was there this June, the Coach House still had its old sign.

IMG_8396With Dr. Robert K. Logan, near the Coach House, June 2015.

But now the Coach House has a new sign with the old name.

IMG_0835Michael McLuhan (on the right), his son Arthur and daughter Gwendolyn,
under the new banner with the old name. 10.21.2015

IMG_0840With Michael McLuhan

IMG_0863Sandra Danilovic, David Nostbakhen, Paolo Granata, Michael McLuhan, and Seamus Ross,
the Coach House Institute Acting Director.

Michael McLuhan tells stories about this house. In particular, he mentions famous people who visited this place in the pierre_trudeau70s, including Pierre Trudeau, the then Prime Minister of Canada. “Was he a Liberal?” – asks Michael ironically. “Many of them are Liberals,” responds Robert K. Logan* (in a brown coat), professor emeritus at the University of Toronto and co-author of Marshall McLuhan.

Here is the background of the story. October 20th was the day right after election day 2015, when the Liberals won the Parliament majority and Justin Trudeau became the Prime Minister designate, ready to return to under his paternal roof, at the prime minister’s residence in Ottawa, where he was born and spent the first years of his life in the early 70s.

 

IMG_0862As told by Michael, John Lennon and Yoko Ono once sat right at that spot,
where the gentleman in red is standing, and were talking to Marshall McLuhan about peace.

IMG_0910Alex Kuskis, Adjunct Professor of Communication at the Gonzaga University,
who was awarded by the Media Ecology Association for his blog McLuhan Galaxy,
is telling the congregation about the significance of McLuhan’s legacy,
and greeting the revitalization of McLuhan’s program.

 

IMG_0896Eric McLuhan, a son and coauthor of MM, and his son Andrew (close to the door),
who helps him to read and organize Marshall’s archives, have come.

Eric recalls his father being asked, in this room, “How to study media?” “Study language,” was Marshall McLuhan’s answer.

 

IMG_0915Andrew McLuhan and Paolo Granata, a McLuhan Centenary Fellow at the Coach House Institute
and University of Bologna Professor, a locomotive of the new program.

What could be a more appealing subject for a picture than ourselves? Here we are, stunning in McLuhan’s “zombie trance of Narcissus narcosis”… though, it’s still enjoyable, at least for me. So, no chance to avoid a selfie.

IMG_0917With Andrew McLuhan, Paolo Granata, and Rita Leistner,
the author of a fantastic book, Looking for Marshall McLuhan in Afghanistan.

 

IMG_0926Small talks, big ideas. Paolo Granata, Michael McLuhan, Eric McLuhan, and Rita Leistner

By the way, Eric McLuhan is launching his latest book The Sensus Communis, Synesthesia and the Soul: an Odyssey at the McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology Friday, November 6th at 7pm. All are welcome to attend.

And here is my favourite picture from that party.

While Canada is celebrating the Liberals’ victory and greeting the next Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Dr. Logan tells the famous story about McLuhan inviting Trudeau Sr., the then Prime Minister (the late 70s), to attend McLuhan’s seminar at the Coach House, which was conducted at the time by Dr. Logan. McLuhan wanted to astonish participants with such a prominent guest. But he himself was surprised when the Prime Minister came to the room and said to Dr. Logan, “Hi Bob, how are you?”

They happened to be familiar, since Dr. Logan had been one of Pierre Trudeau’s policy advisors.

Here on the picture, Dr. Logan is showing how Pierre Trudeau was entering the very same room through the very same door, while Andrew McLuhan, behind, photobombs.

IMG_0939

Below is the story, as told by Robert Logan himself in his book McLuhan Misunderstood: Setting the Record Straight.

“Let me relay one example in which he wanted to play a trick on his students. One day not long after I began working with him, Marshall asked me to host his weekly Monday-night seminar. He told me he was having dinner with Prime Minister Trudeau and he wanted to bring the PM to the seminar and surprise the group, so I was to say nothing about this. I kept my word. When I heard the motorcycles accompanying the PM approach the coach house where we held our seminar, I, and I alone in that room, knew what was about to happen. McLuhan strode into the room and exclaimed, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, the Prime Minister of Canada.’ Mr. Trudeau came into the room looked around to greet everyone, spotted me, and said, “Bob, hi! How are you?” Marshall’s jaw dropped, for he did not know that I was one of Trudeau’s policy advisors; I had never gotten around to telling him about my work in politics. He enjoyed the trick he played on the seminar group, and I enjoyed the one I played on him.”

Logan, Robert (2013-10-16). McLuhan Misunderstood: Setting the Record Straight (Kindle Locations 700-705). The Key Publishing House Inc.. Kindle Edition)

On my way back home, miles away from Toronto, later that night, I met Eric and Andrew McLuhan once again, and had another 15 minutes of memorable conversation.

IMG_0941It’s Canada – you can meet the McLuhans even at a gas station at night.

Andrey Miroshnichenko

To read more

McLuhan Program Fall 2015 Launch Meeting, The Coach House, University of Toronto. McLuhan Galaxy Blog.

The McLuhan Program Launches “City as Classroom: Ideas Without Walls”

To download a pdf brochure of the fall schedule: McLuhan Program (Fall 2015)

From Andrey Mir’s Human as Media blog: http://tinyurl.com/odxdmwy


Categories: Blog

New Book Announcement: The Sensus Communis, Synesthesia & the Soul by Eric McLuhan

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 10/27/2015 - 6:17pm

In this essay of extraordinary scope and depth, Eric McLuhan explores faith as a form of knowing. He does so against the backdrop of preliterate man’s concrete, bodily submersion in the putting on of poetry and drama (the practice of mimesis) and post-literate man’s bodiless submersion in electronic communication, in which sender and receiver are everywhere and nowhere at once. In traversing the Aristotelian and Medieval concept of sensus communis, he examines synesthesia as, in effect, its operating system and charts the modern and contemporary mandate to embrace the discarnate. He washes up on the shore of religion as he uncovers a trinity of knowledge, that is, three kinds of sensus communis – the five physical senses, the four intellectual senses of Scripture (historical, allegorical, tropological, and anagogical), and the three theological senses (faith, hope, and charity)-each of the three complete in itself yet interacting with one another. A fascinating odyssey that will dazzle the senses.

Addendum October 28:  Eric McLuhan is launching his latest book ‘The Sensus Communis, Synesthesia and the Soul: an Odyssey‘ at the McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology, St. Michael’s College, U of Toronto on Friday, November 6 at 7pm. All are welcome.

 Eric McLuhan press portraitAbout the Author

Eric McLuhan, PhD, a renowned literary and communications theorist, is also the author, most recently, of Cynic Satire, The Human Equation series (written with mime artist Wayne Constantineau), Theories of Communication, and Media and Formal Cause. Earlier, he co-authored essays and books with Marshall McLuhan including Laws of Media: The New Science and published The Role of Thunder in Finnegans Wake, among other books. McLuhan lives in Bloomfield, Ontario.


Categories: Blog

New Book Announcement: The Sensus Communis, Synesthesia & the Soul by Eric McLuhan

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 10/27/2015 - 6:17pm

In this essay of extraordinary scope and depth, Eric McLuhan explores faith as a form of knowing. He does so against the backdrop of preliterate man’s concrete, bodily submersion in the putting on of poetry and drama (the practice of mimesis) and post-literate man’s bodiless submersion in electronic communication, in which sender and receiver are everywhere and nowhere at once. In traversing the Aristotelian and Medieval concept of sensus communis, he examines synesthesia as, in effect, its operating system and charts the modern and contemporary mandate to embrace the discarnate. He washes up on the shore of religion as he uncovers a trinity of knowledge, that is, three kinds of sensus communis – the five physical senses, the four intellectual senses of Scripture (historical, allegorical, tropological, and anagogical), and the three theological senses (faith, hope, and charity)-each of the three complete in itself yet interacting with one another. A fascinating odyssey that will dazzle the senses.

Addendum October 28:  Eric McLuhan is launching his latest book ‘The Sensus Communis, Synesthesia and the Soul: an Odyssey‘ at the McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology, St. Michael’s College, U of Toronto on Friday, November 6 at 7pm. All are welcome.

 Eric McLuhan press portraitAbout the Author

Eric McLuhan, PhD, a renowned literary and communications theorist, is also the author, most recently, of Cynic Satire, The Human Equation series (written with mime artist Wayne Constantineau), Theories of Communication, and Media and Formal Cause. Earlier, he co-authored essays and books with Marshall McLuhan including Laws of Media: The New Science and published The Role of Thunder in Finnegans Wake, among other books. McLuhan lives in Bloomfield, Ontario.


Categories: Blog

McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology Seminar & Workshop, November 2 & 4, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 10/26/2015 - 11:15am

New Coach Hose

Inaugural Monday Night Seminar – City as Classroom
Monday, November 2, 6:00 pm to 8:00 PM

Location: The Coach House, 39A Queen’s Park Crescent, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto

How do digital technologies support or hinder “community” in the city and the global village? With Lauren O’Neil, Tonya Surman, Mark Surman LAUREN O’NEIL is one Canada’s most prominent young internet personalities, best known as the host of CBC News Live Online and as a trends blogger for CBC News. Her innate ability to find, share and produce interesting stories have earned Lauren a respectable following both online and off. Prior to joining CBC News, Lauren had worked as a writer, TV host and copywriter for such outlets as the Toronto Star, MTV Canada, MuchMusic, Yahoo! Canada, CosmoTV and Entrinsic. Named one of Marketing Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 “smartest young thinkers”, she speakers regularly at media-centric events around the nation. 

“The future of city may be very much like a world’s fair –a place to show off new technology – not a place of work or residence whatever”. – Marshall McLuhan
Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

*****

Workshop: Museum Without Walls 

Wenesday, November 4, 2:00pm to 6:00 pm

Location: The Coach House, 39A Queen’s Park Crescent, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto

Moderator: Paolo Granata, McLuhan Centenary Fellow
The workshop aims to probe and develop storytelling for the historical, artistic and cultural heritage through mobile technologies, and new forms of culture. Participants will better understand how naratives inhabits our digital world, as well as how we can use it to increase our understanding of dynamic environmental settings.

Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology logo


Categories: Blog

McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology Seminar & Workshop, November 2 & 4, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 10/26/2015 - 11:15am

New Coach Hose

Inaugural Monday Night Seminar – City as Classroom
Monday, November 2, 6:00 pm to 8:00 PM

Location: The Coach House, 39A Queen’s Park Crescent, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto

How do digital technologies support or hinder “community” in the city and the global village? With Lauren O’Neil, Tonya Surman, Mark Surman LAUREN O’NEIL is one Canada’s most prominent young internet personalities, best known as the host of CBC News Live Online and as a trends blogger for CBC News. Her innate ability to find, share and produce interesting stories have earned Lauren a respectable following both online and off. Prior to joining CBC News, Lauren had worked as a writer, TV host and copywriter for such outlets as the Toronto Star, MTV Canada, MuchMusic, Yahoo! Canada, CosmoTV and Entrinsic. Named one of Marketing Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 “smartest young thinkers”, she speakers regularly at media-centric events around the nation. 

“The future of city may be very much like a world’s fair –a place to show off new technology – not a place of work or residence whatever”. – Marshall McLuhan
Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

*****

Workshop: Museum Without Walls 

Wenesday, November 4, 2:00pm to 6:00 pm

Location: The Coach House, 39A Queen’s Park Crescent, St. Michael’s College, University of Toronto

Moderator: Paolo Granata, McLuhan Centenary Fellow
The workshop aims to probe and develop storytelling for the historical, artistic and cultural heritage through mobile technologies, and new forms of culture. Participants will better understand how naratives inhabits our digital world, as well as how we can use it to increase our understanding of dynamic environmental settings.

Registration is free. Reserve a spot here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology logo


Categories: Blog

McLuhan in an Age of Social Media, Kindle Edition, by Paul Levinson

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 10/24/2015 - 6:35pm

This essay can be considered a new chapter in my book Digital McLuhan, published in 1999, or before the advent of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and the social media of our age. Marshall McLuhan’s ideas, including hot and cool, the medium is the message, and the tetrad, are applied to help us understand selfies, tweeting, iconic television shows such as The Sorpanos and Mad Men, the Arab Spring, the U.S. Presidential election of 2016, and the Kindle revolution itself.

Note: If you don’t own a Kindle, you can enter your mobile number or email address at this product’s listing page at Amazon.com and they’ll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer – no Kindle device required.

  • File Size: 1395 KB
  • Print Length: 16 pages
  • Publisher: Connected Editions (October 22, 2015)
  • Publication Date: October 22, 2015
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English

Available from Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/qdfwmaj OR Amazon Canada: http://tinyurl.com/q6rsvmt .

Paul Levinson’s Biography

Paul Levinson, PhD, is Professor of Communication & Media Studies at Fordham University in New York City. His nine nonfiction books, including The Soft Edge (1997), Digital McLuhan (1999),Realspace (2003), Cellphone (2004), and New New Media (2009/2012) have been the subject of major articles in The New York Times, Wired, The Christian Science Monitor, and other publications and have been translated into ten languages. New New Media, exploring blogging, Twitter, YouTube and other “new new” modes of communication, was published by Penguin Academics in 2009, revised and updated in 2012. His science fiction novels include The Silk Code (1999/2012, winner of the Locus Award for Best First Novel), Borrowed Tides (2001), The Consciousness Plague (2002/2013),The Pixel Eye (2003/2014), The Plot To Save Socrates (2006/2012), Unburning Alexandria (2013), and Chronica (2014). His short stories have been nominated for Nebula, Hugo, Edgar, and Sturgeon Awards. Paul Levinson has appeared on “The O’Reilly Factor” (Fox News), “The CBS Evening News,” “NewsHour with Jim Lehrer” (PBS), “Nightline” (ABC), and numerous national and international TV and radio programs. He reviews the best of television in his InfiniteRegress.tv blog, hosts popular podcasts, and was listed in The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s “Top 10 Academic Twitterers” in 2009.

 A Guide to the Information Millennium - Paul Levinson
Categories: Blog

McLuhan in an Age of Social Media, Kindle Edition, by Paul Levinson

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 10/24/2015 - 6:35pm

This essay can be considered a new chapter in my book Digital McLuhan, published in 1999, or before the advent of Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and the social media of our age. Marshall McLuhan’s ideas, including hot and cool, the medium is the message, and the tetrad, are applied to help us understand selfies, tweeting, iconic television shows such as The Sorpanos and Mad Men, the Arab Spring, the U.S. Presidential election of 2016, and the Kindle revolution itself.

Note: If you don’t own a Kindle, you can enter your mobile number or email address at this product’s listing page at Amazon.com and they’ll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer – no Kindle device required.

  • File Size: 1395 KB
  • Print Length: 16 pages
  • Publisher: Connected Editions (October 22, 2015)
  • Publication Date: October 22, 2015
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English

Available from Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/qdfwmaj OR Amazon Canada: http://tinyurl.com/q6rsvmt .

Paul Levinson’s Biography

Paul Levinson, PhD, is Professor of Communication & Media Studies at Fordham University in New York City. His nine nonfiction books, including The Soft Edge (1997), Digital McLuhan (1999),Realspace (2003), Cellphone (2004), and New New Media (2009/2012) have been the subject of major articles in The New York Times, Wired, The Christian Science Monitor, and other publications and have been translated into ten languages. New New Media, exploring blogging, Twitter, YouTube and other “new new” modes of communication, was published by Penguin Academics in 2009, revised and updated in 2012. His science fiction novels include The Silk Code (1999/2012, winner of the Locus Award for Best First Novel), Borrowed Tides (2001), The Consciousness Plague (2002/2013),The Pixel Eye (2003/2014), The Plot To Save Socrates (2006/2012), Unburning Alexandria (2013), and Chronica (2014). His short stories have been nominated for Nebula, Hugo, Edgar, and Sturgeon Awards. Paul Levinson has appeared on “The O’Reilly Factor” (Fox News), “The CBS Evening News,” “NewsHour with Jim Lehrer” (PBS), “Nightline” (ABC), and numerous national and international TV and radio programs. He reviews the best of television in his InfiniteRegress.tv blog, hosts popular podcasts, and was listed in The Chronicle of Higher Education‘s “Top 10 Academic Twitterers” in 2009.

 A Guide to the Information Millennium - Paul Levinson
Categories: Blog

Hillary Clinton’s “Cool” Performance (on TV) at the Benghazi Congressional Hearing

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 10/23/2015 - 6:58pm

Hot and Cool Media

Laurence O’Donnell on his MSNBC program last night cited Marshall McLuhan’s hot and cool media distinction  to describe Hillary Clinton’s impressive performance at the 11-hour Benghazi congressional hearing on Thursday: “It was in McLuhan’s 1964 seminal work ‘Understanding Media’ that he said ‘TV is a cool medium.’ He described the first televised presidential debate as a contest between hot and cool. Richard Nixon was hot and seemingly angry. John F. Kennedy stayed cool. McLuhan insisted that on TV cool will always win. Today is was as if Hillary Clinton reread McLuhan last night and Trey Gowdy has never heard of him.”

Marshall McLuhan offered a concise and clear explanation of the difference between hot and cool media for a popular non-academic audience in the Playboy interview in 1969:

“Basically, a hot medium excludes and a cool medium includes; hot media are low in participation, or completion, by the audience and cool media are high in participation. A hot medium is one that extends a single sense with high definition. High definition means a complete filling in of data by the medium without intense audience participation. A photograph, for example, is high definition or hot; whereas a cartoon is low definition or cool, because the rough outline drawing provides very little visual data and requires the viewer to fill in or complete the image himself. The telephone, which gives the ear relatively little data, is thus cool, as is speech; both demand considerable filling in by the listener. On the other hand, radio is a hot medium because it sharply and intensely provides great amounts of high-definition auditory information that leaves little or nothing to be filled in by the audience. A lecture, by the same token, is hot, but a seminar is cool; a book is hot, but a conversation or bull session is cool.

In a cool medium, the audience is an active constituent of the viewing or listening experience. A girl wearing open-mesh silk stockings or glasses is inherently cool and sensual because the eye acts as a surrogate hand in filling in the low-definition image thus engendered. Which is why boys make passes at girls who wear glasses. In any case, the overwhelming majority of our technologies and entertainments since the introduction of print technology have been hot, fragmented and exclusive, but in the age of television we see a return to cool values and the inclusive in-depth involvement and participation they engender. This is, of course, just one more reason why the medium is the message, rather than the content; it is the participatory nature of the TV experience itself that is important, rather than the content of the particular TV image that is being invisibly and indelibly inscribed on our skins.” – Playboy interview, 1969

The full Playboy interview can be read here: http://tinyurl.com/ppolwse

Read Corey Anton’s excellent reappraisal of the distinction between hot and cool media that was published on this blog here: http://tinyurl.com/nfrdcfw .


Categories: Blog

Hillary Clinton’s “Cool” Performance (on TV) at the Benghazi Congressional Hearing

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 10/23/2015 - 6:58pm

Hot and Cool Media

Laurence O’Donnell on his MSNBC program last night cited Marshall McLuhan’s hot and cool media distinction  to describe Hillary Clinton’s impressive performance at the 11-hour Benghazi congressional hearing on Thursday: “It was in McLuhan’s 1964 seminal work ‘Understanding Media’ that he said ‘TV is a cool medium.’ He described the first televised presidential debate as a contest between hot and cool. Richard Nixon was hot and seemingly angry. John F. Kennedy stayed cool. McLuhan insisted that on TV cool will always win. Today is was as if Hillary Clinton reread McLuhan last night and Trey Gowdy has never heard of him.”

Marshall McLuhan offered a concise and clear explanation of the difference between hot and cool media for a popular non-academic audience in the Playboy interview in 1969:

“Basically, a hot medium excludes and a cool medium includes; hot media are low in participation, or completion, by the audience and cool media are high in participation. A hot medium is one that extends a single sense with high definition. High definition means a complete filling in of data by the medium without intense audience participation. A photograph, for example, is high definition or hot; whereas a cartoon is low definition or cool, because the rough outline drawing provides very little visual data and requires the viewer to fill in or complete the image himself. The telephone, which gives the ear relatively little data, is thus cool, as is speech; both demand considerable filling in by the listener. On the other hand, radio is a hot medium because it sharply and intensely provides great amounts of high-definition auditory information that leaves little or nothing to be filled in by the audience. A lecture, by the same token, is hot, but a seminar is cool; a book is hot, but a conversation or bull session is cool.

In a cool medium, the audience is an active constituent of the viewing or listening experience. A girl wearing open-mesh silk stockings or glasses is inherently cool and sensual because the eye acts as a surrogate hand in filling in the low-definition image thus engendered. Which is why boys make passes at girls who wear glasses. In any case, the overwhelming majority of our technologies and entertainments since the introduction of print technology have been hot, fragmented and exclusive, but in the age of television we see a return to cool values and the inclusive in-depth involvement and participation they engender. This is, of course, just one more reason why the medium is the message, rather than the content; it is the participatory nature of the TV experience itself that is important, rather than the content of the particular TV image that is being invisibly and indelibly inscribed on our skins.” – Playboy interview, 1969

The full Playboy interview can be read here: http://tinyurl.com/ppolwse

Read Corey Anton’s excellent reappraisal of the distinction between hot and cool media that was published on this blog here: http://tinyurl.com/nfrdcfw .


Categories: Blog

McLuhan Program Fall 2015 Launch Meeting, The Coach House, University of Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Wed, 10/21/2015 - 4:07pm

Robert Lansdale Collection, U of T Archive

The McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology at the Coach House Institute, Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, announced its Fall 2015 program of Monday Night seminars, workshops, a New Explorations Group, and special events last night at the McLuhan Coach House at the University of Toronto. It will enable students, media practitioners, artists and other interested parties to engage with some of the brightest minds and practitioners exploring the quickly changing and confounding world around us.

Members of the McLuhan family were in attendance, Michael McLuhan, his son Arthur and daughter Gwendolyn, Eric McLuhan and son Andrew, as well as the McLuhan Centenary Fellows for 2015/2016. Finally, in partnership with the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto, the occasion also celebrated the 52nd Anniversary of the opening of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Culture & Technology (founded on October 24, 1963 by Marshall McLuhan), and new signage for the McLuhan Centre was officially unveiled (see photo below).

There are four series of events scheduled as follows:-

  • Monday Night Seminars: First is a Monday Night series called “City as Classroom” with two related themes. Some of the seminars focus on the city itself, looking for metaphoric meanings of our urban homes and communities in a “classroom without walls” that informs fulfillment and survival in the larger global village. Others seminars engage participants in “ideas without walls” in the context of a “safe house for unsafe ideas”, to explore “what matters most now” about the human, about our cultures, our beliefs and our survival in an increasingly technologized and robotized age. Well known intellectuals, practitioners and raconteurs as well as city planners, academics, artists, business people, scientists, musicians and media figures will be participants, in the very Coach House where Marshall McLuhan n fired our creative imagination.
  • Workshops: Second, a series of workshops will be conducted by the 2015/2016 crop of McLuhan Centenary Fellows. These fellows have been chosen for their leadership in thought and enterprise of significance to the current and future prospects of the Coach House Institute, the university, the city, our country and the larger international network. Each fellow will engage iSchool students and students of the St Michael’s College Book and Media Studies in a collaborative exploration of the research and exciting projects the fellows bring with them. These workshops will be open to all interested within and outside the university. The workshops include: Museum Without Walls (Paolo Granata, Nov.4), The Case of Surplus Music (Sandy Pearlman, Nov. 11), Marshalling Media (David Nostbakken, Nov. 18), What’s on your mind? (or, making the most of a situation) (Dec. 2, John Osweld).
  • Third, a series of activities called “The New Explorations Group” are being staged by graduate students of the iSchool as an “instajammable” experiencement in how to be human in the C21st. Sessions include: Karaoke Hell & Finding a/your Voice to Yell (Oct. 28), Modes of Consciousness & Training in Sensibility (Nov. 11), Improv Improv (Dec. 2).
  • And finally a special event series aims to engage a growing community of intersect in casting a froward vision from the prescient legacy of Marshall McLuhan. Events include: 52nd Anniversary of the Opening of the McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology  (Oct. 20), Screening “McLuhan’s Wake” (Nov. 25), McLuhan “Then Now Next” Round Table (Dec. 9), Seasonal Reception (Dec. 14).

Online free registration for events can be made through Eventbrite here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

You can download A pdf brochure of the fall schedule from here McLuhan Program (Fall 2015) .

CoachHouse_New New Signage at the Coach House


Categories: Blog

McLuhan Program Fall 2015 Launch Meeting, The Coach House, University of Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Wed, 10/21/2015 - 4:07pm

Robert Lansdale Collection, U of T Archive

The McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology at the Coach House Institute, Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto, announced its Fall 2015 program of Monday Night seminars, workshops, a New Explorations Group, and special events last night at the McLuhan Coach House at the University of Toronto. It will enable students, media practitioners, artists and other interested parties to engage with some of the brightest minds and practitioners exploring the quickly changing and confounding world around us.

Members of the McLuhan family were in attendance, Michael McLuhan, his son Arthur and daughter Gwendolyn, Eric McLuhan and son Andrew, as well as the McLuhan Centenary Fellows for 2015/2016. Finally, in partnership with the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto, the occasion also celebrated the 52nd Anniversary of the opening of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Culture & Technology (founded on October 24, 1963 by Marshall McLuhan), and new signage for the McLuhan Centre was officially unveiled (see photo below).

There are four series of events scheduled as follows:-

  • Monday Night Seminars: First is a Monday Night series called “City as Classroom” with two related themes. Some of the seminars focus on the city itself, looking for metaphoric meanings of our urban homes and communities in a “classroom without walls” that informs fulfillment and survival in the larger global village. Others seminars engage participants in “ideas without walls” in the context of a “safe house for unsafe ideas”, to explore “what matters most now” about the human, about our cultures, our beliefs and our survival in an increasingly technologized and robotized age. Well known intellectuals, practitioners and raconteurs as well as city planners, academics, artists, business people, scientists, musicians and media figures will be participants, in the very Coach House where Marshall McLuhan n fired our creative imagination.
  • Workshops: Second, a series of workshops will be conducted by the 2015/2016 crop of McLuhan Centenary Fellows. These fellows have been chosen for their leadership in thought and enterprise of significance to the current and future prospects of the Coach House Institute, the university, the city, our country and the larger international network. Each fellow will engage iSchool students and students of the St Michael’s College Book and Media Studies in a collaborative exploration of the research and exciting projects the fellows bring with them. These workshops will be open to all interested within and outside the university. The workshops include: Museum Without Walls (Paolo Granata, Nov.4), The Case of Surplus Music (Sandy Pearlman, Nov. 11), Marshalling Media (David Nostbakken, Nov. 18), What’s on your mind? (or, making the most of a situation) (Dec. 2, John Osweld).
  • Third, a series of activities called “The New Explorations Group” are being staged by graduate students of the iSchool as an “instajammable” experiencement in how to be human in the C21st. Sessions include: Karaoke Hell & Finding a/your Voice to Yell (Oct. 28), Modes of Consciousness & Training in Sensibility (Nov. 11), Improv Improv (Dec. 2).
  • And finally a special event series aims to engage a growing community of intersect in casting a froward vision from the prescient legacy of Marshall McLuhan. Events include: 52nd Anniversary of the Opening of the McLuhan Centre for Culture & Technology  (Oct. 20), Screening “McLuhan’s Wake” (Nov. 25), McLuhan “Then Now Next” Round Table (Dec. 9), Seasonal Reception (Dec. 14).

Online free registration for events can be made through Eventbrite here: http://www.chi.utoronto.ca/events/

You can download A pdf brochure of the fall schedule from here McLuhan Program (Fall 2015) .

CoachHouse_New New Signage at the Coach House


Categories: Blog
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