Blog

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/17/2014 - 7:55pm

On the eve of our Media Ecology Association convention in Toronto, here’s a timely NY Times Sunday Book Review piece addressing a fundamental media ecology concern……..Alex

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

JUNE 17, 2014

 Each week in Bookends, two writers take on questions about the world of books. Fifty years ago, Marshall McLuhan suggested that the electronic image had supplanted the written word. This week, Dana Stevens and Rivka Galchen discuss whether we are living in a new revolutionary age, or just a continuation of the old one.

By Dana Stevens

What would the creator of the phrase “global village” have to say about its current incarnation, the Internet?

To read “Understanding Media” in 2014 is to wish McLuhan, who died in 1980 at the age of 69, were still available in theater lobbies for consultation. The book is a structural maze whose repetitiveness, rhetorical vagueness and propensity for brazen self-contradiction will drive your inner editor to contemplate rash acts. But flashing out of the murk at regular intervals are aphoristic bursts of uncannily prescient wisdom about the history and future of the various technologies of human communication — what McLuhan refers to in the book’s subtitle as “the extensions of man.” After a while you get accustomed to the terrain of McLuhan’s mind — a place of dizzying shifts and precipitous drops, crammed to bursting with false etymologies and weirdly inapposite literary references, where making sense is less important than making big, bold connections. “The electric light is pure information.” “Print technology transformed the medieval zero into the Renaissance infinity.” “Einstein pronounced the doom of continuous or ‘rational’ space, and the way was made clear for Picasso and the Marx Brothers and Mad.” These sweeping, oracular pronouncements don’t always lend themselves to paraphrase or rational explanation. Rather, they function as invitations to readers to use these ideas as tools in their own thinking about media, which perhaps explains why McLuhan later called his mantra-like formulations “probes.”

By Rivka Galchen

The written word is dying. Even if it never entirely expires, other mediums of expression are consuming the limited oxygen.

 The written word has been dying for so long!!! Exclamation points have finally revealed themselves as the sleeper cells of Image?! Image, which is so much better at getting us to buy something? You’ve read this argument before. Then we say that kids these days, they never read — they never read! — or, kids these days, they heart reading, and their tweets are Wildean epigrams, and Kanye West is a god of language . . . although that’s not written language, it’s . . . sometimes we get lost, it’s difficult to stay on point in conversation, especially because a terrible death blow was dealt to conversation, by literacy. It’s true, literacy has made conversational dum-dums of us all. Look at how witty the dialogue is in Shakespeare . . . most everybody back then could follow that sort of thing . . . and now we can’t, not only because we don’t speak Elizabethan English, but because we spend so much time reading . . . time that could be spent conversing, bantering . . . and that’s why the Elizabethans could have nuanced merry wars and everyone could follow and think up quick wordplay responses, because back then, talking was most all there was for most people to do . . . so we were better at it.

Those are two out of context quotes. Read the full article at http://tinyurl.com/okhnrap  .


Categories: Blog

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/17/2014 - 7:55pm

On the eve of our Media Ecology Association convention in Toronto, here’s a timely NY Times Sunday Book Review piece addressing a fundamental media ecology concern……..Alex

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

JUNE 17, 2014

 Each week in Bookends, two writers take on questions about the world of books. Fifty years ago, Marshall McLuhan suggested that the electronic image had supplanted the written word. This week, Dana Stevens and Rivka Galchen discuss whether we are living in a new revolutionary age, or just a continuation of the old one.

By Dana Stevens

What would the creator of the phrase “global village” have to say about its current incarnation, the Internet?

To read “Understanding Media” in 2014 is to wish McLuhan, who died in 1980 at the age of 69, were still available in theater lobbies for consultation. The book is a structural maze whose repetitiveness, rhetorical vagueness and propensity for brazen self-contradiction will drive your inner editor to contemplate rash acts. But flashing out of the murk at regular intervals are aphoristic bursts of uncannily prescient wisdom about the history and future of the various technologies of human communication — what McLuhan refers to in the book’s subtitle as “the extensions of man.” After a while you get accustomed to the terrain of McLuhan’s mind — a place of dizzying shifts and precipitous drops, crammed to bursting with false etymologies and weirdly inapposite literary references, where making sense is less important than making big, bold connections. “The electric light is pure information.” “Print technology transformed the medieval zero into the Renaissance infinity.” “Einstein pronounced the doom of continuous or ‘rational’ space, and the way was made clear for Picasso and the Marx Brothers and Mad.” These sweeping, oracular pronouncements don’t always lend themselves to paraphrase or rational explanation. Rather, they function as invitations to readers to use these ideas as tools in their own thinking about media, which perhaps explains why McLuhan later called his mantra-like formulations “probes.”

By Rivka Galchen

The written word is dying. Even if it never entirely expires, other mediums of expression are consuming the limited oxygen.

 The written word has been dying for so long!!! Exclamation points have finally revealed themselves as the sleeper cells of Image?! Image, which is so much better at getting us to buy something? You’ve read this argument before. Then we say that kids these days, they never read — they never read! — or, kids these days, they heart reading, and their tweets are Wildean epigrams, and Kanye West is a god of language . . . although that’s not written language, it’s . . . sometimes we get lost, it’s difficult to stay on point in conversation, especially because a terrible death blow was dealt to conversation, by literacy. It’s true, literacy has made conversational dum-dums of us all. Look at how witty the dialogue is in Shakespeare . . . most everybody back then could follow that sort of thing . . . and now we can’t, not only because we don’t speak Elizabethan English, but because we spend so much time reading . . . time that could be spent conversing, bantering . . . and that’s why the Elizabethans could have nuanced merry wars and everyone could follow and think up quick wordplay responses, because back then, talking was most all there was for most people to do . . . so we were better at it.

Those are two out of context quotes. Read the full article at http://tinyurl.com/okhnrap  .


Categories: Blog

Erik Davis on Acoustic Cyberspace

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/15/2014 - 7:58pm

Davis erik 2008 rauner michael.jpg Erik Davis

A talk delivered at the Xchange conference, Riga, Latvia, November 1997

Today I’d like to talk about some abstract ideas, some images, some open-ended notions about acoustic space. In particular, I am interested in the relationship between electronic sound and environments, on the Internet or in music. I won’t talk about the various technologies involved; instead, I’ll try to get at some of the deeper issues about sound and the ways it constructs subjectivities and can act as a kind of map.

A good place to start is with a distinction that Marshall McLuhan draws between visual space and acoustic space. McLuhan used the notion of visual space as a way to describe how Western subjectivity has been organized on a technical basis since the Renaissance. McLuhan argued that Renaissance perspective not only provided a powerful new way of organizing the visual field (in terms of representation), but also engendered a very specific form of subjectivity. He didn’t just associate this subjectivity with the point-of-view produced by Renaissance perspective painting—he related to it also to print technologies and to the new form of the book. In essence, he argued that the self that comes down to us from the Renaissance—the “molar” self of the modern West, as some have called it—is a visual self.

Renaissance perspective thus serves as a pictorial analogy for a much more general phenomenon—the power to create a distinct, single point of view that organizes thought and perception along linear lines. This is related to print technologies—and print culture—because, according to McLuhan, these technologies inculcate within us a habit of organizing the world in a linear, atomized, and sequential fashion. Central to this visual space is the axiom or assumption that “different” objects, vectors, or points are not and cannot be superimposed; instead, the world is perceived as a linear grid organized along strictly causal lines.

McLuhan contrasts this construction of visual space, and the kind of subjectivity associated with it, with what he calls “acoustic space.” Acoustic space is the space we hear rather than the space we see, and he argued that electronic media were submerging us in this acoustic environment, with its own language of affect and subjectivity. Acoustic space isn’t limited to a world of music or sound; the environment of electronic media itself engenders this way of organizing and perceiving the other spaces we intersect. (Read the rest of this essay at http://www.techgnosis.com/acoustic.html ).

Erik Davis is the author of Techgnosis: Myth, magic + mysticism in the age of information: http://techgnosis.com/techgnosis/techgnosis.html

 Read more about him here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Davis .

Visual versus Acoustic Space. Source: Gordon A. Gow, “Spatial Metaphor in the Work of Marshall McLuhan,” 75


Categories: Blog

Erik Davis on Acoustic Cyberspace

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/15/2014 - 7:58pm

Davis erik 2008 rauner michael.jpg Erik Davis

A talk delivered at the Xchange conference, Riga, Latvia, November 1997

Today I’d like to talk about some abstract ideas, some images, some open-ended notions about acoustic space. In particular, I am interested in the relationship between electronic sound and environments, on the Internet or in music. I won’t talk about the various technologies involved; instead, I’ll try to get at some of the deeper issues about sound and the ways it constructs subjectivities and can act as a kind of map.

A good place to start is with a distinction that Marshall McLuhan draws between visual space and acoustic space. McLuhan used the notion of visual space as a way to describe how Western subjectivity has been organized on a technical basis since the Renaissance. McLuhan argued that Renaissance perspective not only provided a powerful new way of organizing the visual field (in terms of representation), but also engendered a very specific form of subjectivity. He didn’t just associate this subjectivity with the point-of-view produced by Renaissance perspective painting—he related to it also to print technologies and to the new form of the book. In essence, he argued that the self that comes down to us from the Renaissance—the “molar” self of the modern West, as some have called it—is a visual self.

Renaissance perspective thus serves as a pictorial analogy for a much more general phenomenon—the power to create a distinct, single point of view that organizes thought and perception along linear lines. This is related to print technologies—and print culture—because, according to McLuhan, these technologies inculcate within us a habit of organizing the world in a linear, atomized, and sequential fashion. Central to this visual space is the axiom or assumption that “different” objects, vectors, or points are not and cannot be superimposed; instead, the world is perceived as a linear grid organized along strictly causal lines.

McLuhan contrasts this construction of visual space, and the kind of subjectivity associated with it, with what he calls “acoustic space.” Acoustic space is the space we hear rather than the space we see, and he argued that electronic media were submerging us in this acoustic environment, with its own language of affect and subjectivity. Acoustic space isn’t limited to a world of music or sound; the environment of electronic media itself engenders this way of organizing and perceiving the other spaces we intersect. (Read the rest of this essay at http://www.techgnosis.com/acoustic.html ).

Erik Davis is the author of Techgnosis: Myth, magic + mysticism in the age of information: http://techgnosis.com/techgnosis/techgnosis.html

 Read more about him here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Davis .

Visual versus Acoustic Space. Source: Gordon A. Gow, “Spatial Metaphor in the Work of Marshall McLuhan,” 75


Categories: Blog

“Lines of Thought” – McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology in Conjunction with the 15th Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association in Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 06/13/2014 - 9:13pm

Walter Hall, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

Friday June 20th

Reception 6:00-7:15 p.m.

Lines of Thought, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Curators: John Oswald & Dominique Scheffel-Dunand

An evening presenting McLuhanesque thinkers in a unique combination of soliloquies and dialogues, probing afresh the interaction of technology and culture in the 21st century. The live audience will be invited to respond and interact electronically.

This event is to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Marshall McLuhan’s iconic text Understanding Media, and to pay tribute to McLuhan by nourishing conversations on the new world views that are shaping contemporary imagination and shouldering questions on what matters now and next.

6:00-7:15 Welcome Reception
Sponsors: St. Michael’s College & The Faculty of Information Coach House Institute – University of Toronto.
Welcoming remarks: Seamus Ross, Dean of the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto
Domenico Pietropaolo, Principal, St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto
Dominique Scheffel-Dunand, Director, Faculty of Information, McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology, University of Toronto
Special Guest: Howard R. Engel, Director, The Marshall McLuhan Initiative, St. Paul’s College, University of Manitoba

7:30-9:30 p.m. Plenary Session: Lines of Thought

Participants: Sandra Braman (Author of Change of State: Information, Policy, and Power & Poet); Liz Dowdeswell Thought leader & practitioner in international development); Arsinée Khanjia (Armenian-Canadian actress and producer who often works with her husband, Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan); Derrick de Kerckhove (McLuhan translator and scholar & Professor); Abdul Khan (Global leader in Information & Communication for Development);Joshua Meyrowitz (Author of No Sense of Place & Professor); David Nostbakken (Media entrepreneur & McLuhan Centenary Fellow); John Oswald (Media artist & Composer);Sandy Pearlman (Music producer and creator & Professor);Greg Power (Public Relations & Communications Professional); David Rokeby (Artist in Visual and video art); Dominique Sheffel-Dunand (Director, McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology & Professor)

Sponsors: St. Michaels’ College in the University of Toronto, the Faculty of Music & The Faculty of Information Coach House Institute at the University of Toronto

MEA Conference participants & all others are requested to RSVP by June 18, 2014 to confirm your attendance via: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lines-of-thought-tickets-3298286263

UM-ban1.jpg (28080 bytes) UM-ban2.jpg (8063 bytes) UM-ban3.jpg (11501 bytes) UM-ban4.jpg (18776 bytes)

How to Get to Walter Hall, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto 

Subway Directions: Most people will be taking the subway from Ryerson to the University of Toronto. From Dundas Station take the train southbound towards Downsview to Museum Station, then refer to map on page 20 of the MEA Conference Program. Especially if shared between a group of people, taking a taxi may also be a reasonable possibility. Because it will be rush hour, delegates should leave themselves plenty of time for the trip. The one-way subway fare is $3 CDN, so it will cost $6 to go there and back.


Categories: Blog

“Lines of Thought” – McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology in Conjunction with the 15th Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association in Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 06/13/2014 - 9:13pm

Walter Hall, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

Friday June 20th

Reception 6:00-7:15 p.m.

Lines of Thought, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Curators: John Oswald & Dominique Scheffel-Dunand

An evening presenting McLuhanesque thinkers in a unique combination of soliloquies and dialogues, probing afresh the interaction of technology and culture in the 21st century. The live audience will be invited to respond and interact electronically.

This event is to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Marshall McLuhan’s iconic text Understanding Media, and to pay tribute to McLuhan by nourishing conversations on the new world views that are shaping contemporary imagination and shouldering questions on what matters now and next.

6:00-7:15 Welcome Reception
Sponsors: St. Michael’s College & The Faculty of Information Coach House Institute – University of Toronto.
Welcoming remarks: Seamus Ross, Dean of the Faculty of Information, University of Toronto
Domenico Pietropaolo, Principal, St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto
Dominique Scheffel-Dunand, Director, Faculty of Information, McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology, University of Toronto
Special Guest: Howard R. Engel, Director, The Marshall McLuhan Initiative, St. Paul’s College, University of Manitoba

7:30-9:30 p.m. Plenary Session: Lines of Thought

Participants: Sandra Braman (Author of Change of State: Information, Policy, and Power & Poet); Liz Dowdeswell Thought leader & practitioner in international development); Arsinée Khanjia (Armenian-Canadian actress and producer who often works with her husband, Canadian filmmaker Atom Egoyan); Derrick de Kerckhove (McLuhan translator and scholar & Professor); Abdul Khan (Global leader in Information & Communication for Development);Joshua Meyrowitz (Author of No Sense of Place & Professor); David Nostbakken (Media entrepreneur & McLuhan Centenary Fellow); John Oswald (Media artist & Composer);Sandy Pearlman (Music producer and creator & Professor);Greg Power (Public Relations & Communications Professional); David Rokeby (Artist in Visual and video art); Dominique Sheffel-Dunand (Director, McLuhan Program in Culture & Technology & Professor)

Sponsors: St. Michaels’ College in the University of Toronto, the Faculty of Music & The Faculty of Information Coach House Institute at the University of Toronto

MEA Conference participants & all others are requested to RSVP by June 18, 2014 to confirm your attendance via: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/lines-of-thought-tickets-3298286263

UM-ban1.jpg (28080 bytes) UM-ban2.jpg (8063 bytes) UM-ban3.jpg (11501 bytes) UM-ban4.jpg (18776 bytes)

How to Get to Walter Hall, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto 

Subway Directions: Most people will be taking the subway from Ryerson to the University of Toronto. From Dundas Station take the train southbound towards Downsview to Museum Station, then refer to map on page 20 of the MEA Conference Program. Especially if shared between a group of people, taking a taxi may also be a reasonable possibility. Because it will be rush hour, delegates should leave themselves plenty of time for the trip. The one-way subway fare is $3 CDN, so it will cost $6 to go there and back.


Categories: Blog

The 15th Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association – Final Program

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 8:45pm

2014 Official Program

CONFRONTING TECHNOPOLY:
CREATIVITY AND THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

RYERSON UNIVERSITY – JUNE 19-22, 2014

Download the full Program in PDF from http://media-ecology.org/activities/2014MEAProgram.pdf

You may Like the conference on our Facebook page here http://tinyurl.com/lkn8at3

CONVENTION HASH TAG: #MEA2014

Photo of Media Ecology Association

THE CONVENTION AT A GLANCE (Download full Program for detailed schedule)

Thursday, June 19
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge (LIB 72)
9:00-9:30 a.m. – Opening ceremony LIB 72
9:45-11:00 a.m. – Session 1.1
11:15-12:30 p.m. – Session 1.2
2:00-3:15 p.m. – Session 1.3
3:45-5:00 p.m. – ‘Addressing Technological Trauma’ – 50th Anniversary Memorial Plenary Session for Understanding Media LIB 72
5:30-7:00 p.m. – Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room: Commemoration and Reception RCC
7:30-9:00 p.m. – Featured Speaker: Joshua Meyrowitz LIB 72

Friday, June 20
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge LIB 72
9:00-10:15 a.m. – Session 2.1
10:30-11:45 a.m. – Session 2.2
1:15-12:15 p.m. – Short Lunch Break
12:15-1:00 p.m. – ‘Innis’s Foray’ – Rick Salutin and Eric Peterson LIB 72
1:15-2:30 p.m. – Session 2.3
2:45-4:00 p.m. – Session 2.4
4:15-5:15 p.m. – Plenary Session: Early Days of the Toronto School of Communication LIB 72
6:00-7:00 p.m. – Welcome Reception: Walter Hall, University of Toronto
7:00-9:00 p.m. – Featured Event: ‘Lines of Thought’ – Walter Hall, University of Toronto

Saturday, June 21
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge LIB 72
9:00-10:15 a.m. – Session 3.1
10:30 a.m.-11:45 a.m. – General Business Meeting (all welcome) LIB 72
11:45a.m.-1:15 p.m. – Lunch Break
1:15-2:30 p.m. – Plenary Session: Technics and the Sacred LIB 72
2:45-4:00 p.m. – Session 3.2

4:15-5:30 p.m. – Keynote Speaker: Ronald J. Deibert LIB 72

6:00-8:00 p.m. – Buffet Dinner Bond Place Hotel

7:00-8:00 p.m. – President’s Address/Awards Ceremony Bond Place Hotel
8:00p.m.-12:00 a.m. – Social

Sunday, June 22
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge LIB 72
9:00-10:15 a.m. – Session 4.1
10:30 a.m.-11:45 p.m. – Session 4.2
12:00-12:15 p.m. – Closing Remarks


Categories: Blog

The 15th Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association – Final Program

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/10/2014 - 8:45pm

2014 Official Program

CONFRONTING TECHNOPOLY:
CREATIVITY AND THE CREATIVE INDUSTRIES
IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

RYERSON UNIVERSITY – JUNE 19-22, 2014

Download the full Program in PDF from http://media-ecology.org/activities/2014MEAProgram.pdf

You may Like the conference on our Facebook page here http://tinyurl.com/lkn8at3

CONVENTION HASH TAG: #MEA2014

Photo of Media Ecology Association

THE CONVENTION AT A GLANCE (Download full Program for detailed schedule)

Thursday, June 19
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge (LIB 72)
9:00-9:30 a.m. – Opening ceremony LIB 72
9:45-11:00 a.m. – Session 1.1
11:15-12:30 p.m. – Session 1.2
2:00-3:15 p.m. – Session 1.3
3:45-5:00 p.m. – ‘Addressing Technological Trauma’ – 50th Anniversary Memorial Plenary Session for Understanding Media LIB 72
5:30-7:00 p.m. – Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room: Commemoration and Reception RCC
7:30-9:00 p.m. – Featured Speaker: Joshua Meyrowitz LIB 72

Friday, June 20
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge LIB 72
9:00-10:15 a.m. – Session 2.1
10:30-11:45 a.m. – Session 2.2
1:15-12:15 p.m. – Short Lunch Break
12:15-1:00 p.m. – ‘Innis’s Foray’ – Rick Salutin and Eric Peterson LIB 72
1:15-2:30 p.m. – Session 2.3
2:45-4:00 p.m. – Session 2.4
4:15-5:15 p.m. – Plenary Session: Early Days of the Toronto School of Communication LIB 72
6:00-7:00 p.m. – Welcome Reception: Walter Hall, University of Toronto
7:00-9:00 p.m. – Featured Event: ‘Lines of Thought’ – Walter Hall, University of Toronto

Saturday, June 21
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge LIB 72
9:00-10:15 a.m. – Session 3.1
10:30 a.m.-11:45 a.m. – General Business Meeting (all welcome) LIB 72
11:45a.m.-1:15 p.m. – Lunch Break
1:15-2:30 p.m. – Plenary Session: Technics and the Sacred LIB 72
2:45-4:00 p.m. – Session 3.2

4:15-5:30 p.m. – Keynote Speaker: Ronald J. Deibert LIB 72

6:00-8:00 p.m. – Buffet Dinner Bond Place Hotel

7:00-8:00 p.m. – President’s Address/Awards Ceremony Bond Place Hotel
8:00p.m.-12:00 a.m. – Social

Sunday, June 22
8:00-9:00 a.m. – Meet and greet at Starbucks/POD 60 Lounge LIB 72
9:00-10:15 a.m. – Session 4.1
10:30 a.m.-11:45 p.m. – Session 4.2
12:00-12:15 p.m. – Closing Remarks


Categories: Blog

Timothy Leary, Marshall McLuhan & Electronic Media

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/08/2014 - 12:08pm

This essay was previously published here, but was taken down by request, pending publication by BoingBoing, where it  just appeared this week. This is a short excerpt and readers should follow the link at bottom to read the full essay, especially the previously unpublished letter from Marshall McLuhan regarding Timothy Leary. The full essay can be found at http://tinyurl.com/p5geazq .

Timothy Leary & Marshall McLuhan, turned on & tuned in

Michael Horowitz and Lisa Rein tell the fascinating tale of McLuhan and Leary’s friendship, and present an unpublished letter from the Leary Archives.

Man is about to make use of that fabulous electrical network he carries around in his skull” – Timothy Leary & Richard Alpert, 1963

“Electric technology, by virtue of its immediate relation to our nervous system, is itself a sort of inner trip, with drugs playing the role of sub-plot or alternative mode. It may well appear a few years hence that the panic about psychedelic drugs relates less to the chemistry than to the hidden terrors which people feel in the presence of electric technology.” –Marshall McLuhan, June 1974 (From a previously unpublished letter, full text below.)

There is no other 1960s intellectual figure whom Timothy Leary came to admire more than Marshall McLuhan. He considered McLuhan’s famous statement – “The medium is the message” — the most important cultural insight of the ‘60s, a decade saturated with insightful and lasting one-liners, some of the most famous coming from Leary’s own brain. Leary has even credited the world’s foremost media theorist with giving him the pep talk that resulted in his own famous mantra: “Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out.”

In 1964, when LSD was fast becoming a national issue on a trajectory that eventually made it the most vilified drug of the decade, McLuhan’s treatise Understanding Media became (alongside The Tibetan Book of the Dead) the latest roadmap for Leary’s positioning on the subject that had increasingly preoccupied him since he and Richard Alpert had been forced out of Harvard, where they had been doing groundbreaking research on psilocybin, LSD and DMT during the early 1960s.

McLuhan argued that all media are “extensions” of our human senses, bodies and minds, that “amplify and accelerate existing processes.” It was the medium itself, regardless of the content, that was the message. Read the full essay here: http://tinyurl.com/p5geazq .

See also Leary, McLuhan and Electronic Technology here: http://tinyurl.com/kzoy9oz .


Categories: Blog

Timothy Leary, Marshall McLuhan & Electronic Media

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/08/2014 - 12:08pm

This essay was previously published here, but was taken down by request, pending publication by BoingBoing, where it  just appeared this week. This is a short excerpt and readers should follow the link at bottom to read the full essay, especially the previously unpublished letter from Marshall McLuhan regarding Timothy Leary. The full essay can be found at http://tinyurl.com/p5geazq .

Timothy Leary & Marshall McLuhan, turned on & tuned in

Michael Horowitz and Lisa Rein tell the fascinating tale of McLuhan and Leary’s friendship, and present an unpublished letter from the Leary Archives.

Man is about to make use of that fabulous electrical network he carries around in his skull” – Timothy Leary & Richard Alpert, 1963

“Electric technology, by virtue of its immediate relation to our nervous system, is itself a sort of inner trip, with drugs playing the role of sub-plot or alternative mode. It may well appear a few years hence that the panic about psychedelic drugs relates less to the chemistry than to the hidden terrors which people feel in the presence of electric technology.” –Marshall McLuhan, June 1974 (From a previously unpublished letter, full text below.)

There is no other 1960s intellectual figure whom Timothy Leary came to admire more than Marshall McLuhan. He considered McLuhan’s famous statement – “The medium is the message” — the most important cultural insight of the ‘60s, a decade saturated with insightful and lasting one-liners, some of the most famous coming from Leary’s own brain. Leary has even credited the world’s foremost media theorist with giving him the pep talk that resulted in his own famous mantra: “Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out.”

In 1964, when LSD was fast becoming a national issue on a trajectory that eventually made it the most vilified drug of the decade, McLuhan’s treatise Understanding Media became (alongside The Tibetan Book of the Dead) the latest roadmap for Leary’s positioning on the subject that had increasingly preoccupied him since he and Richard Alpert had been forced out of Harvard, where they had been doing groundbreaking research on psilocybin, LSD and DMT during the early 1960s.

McLuhan argued that all media are “extensions” of our human senses, bodies and minds, that “amplify and accelerate existing processes.” It was the medium itself, regardless of the content, that was the message. Read the full essay here: http://tinyurl.com/p5geazq .

See also Leary, McLuhan and Electronic Technology here: http://tinyurl.com/kzoy9oz .


Categories: Blog

Marshall McLuhan, Media, & the Ecology of the Digital Age

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 06/07/2014 - 2:29pm

Marshall’s Media Ecologies

For four decades, Marshall McLuhan has been the Bob Dylan of the communication academy. In the late 1960s, Tom Wolfe entertained the thought that McLuhan might be “the most important thinker since Newton, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, and Pavlov . . . the most famous man his country ever produced.” Woody Allen gave him a cameo in the movie Annie HallWired magazine named him its “patron saint,” and bands from Genesis to Radio Free Vestibule have written him tributes. He is more than an intellectual; he is an icon. But Marshall McLuhan, who passed away in 1980, always seemed an unlikely candidate for oracular status.

Born in Alberta, Canada, in 1911, McLuhan was what every concerned father calls a “permanent student.” He received his first undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg in 1933 and took ten years to get his Ph.D. He was a professor his entire professional life, a bookish man with a love for classic literature and an unholy affection for James Joyce’s treatise Finnegan’s Wake; but McLuhan was also Delphic—a prophet for the electronic age—and his aphoristic predictions transcended the academy to seize the imagination of the mainstream.

To oversimplify, McLuhan’s great insight was to see media in its broadest sense: as ecology. The word “medium” (from which “media” was derived), refers to “an intervening substance through which something else is transmitted or carried on.” And that’s the key. McLuhan’s claim was that the intervening substances we use—phonetic letters, radio broadcasts, YouTube videos, blogs, and whispers—are just as important as the messages they convey.

As McLuhan famously put it, the medium is the message; and if, as he claimed, all media are extensions of man, then we are not just the passive recipients of media but a critical part of media itself. This makes media an ecosystem—like a marsh, savannah, or swamp—that surrounds us, consumes us, and works us over in every imaginable way. McLuhan writes, “Environments are not passive wrappings, but are, rather, active processes which are invisible. The ground rules, pervasive structure, and overall patterns of environments elude easy perception.”

And the advent of electronic media in the twentieth century may be the biggest shock to that ecosystem in at least 500 years. McLuhan comments, “The new media are not ways of relating us to the old ‘real’ world; they are the real world and they reshape what remains of the old world at will.”

Whereas the printed word is just an extension of the eye, and the spoken word an extension of the ear, McLuhan claimed that electronic media are an extension of man’s central nervous system—all inclusive and limitless, interactive and multi-sensory. Their nature—light, electricity!—grants them power to impact not simply individual locales, but entire nations in real time, transforming the world from a mass of separate villages to one global village with shared experience and imagery.

Obviously, McLuhan’s volumes of work are too extensive and nuanced to treat comprehensively in one essay, but his basic analysis forces us to ask questions. What are our environments and their boundaries? How do we identify these complex interactions and view our ecosystem in new and interesting ways?

This is an extract from a longer essay titled Marshall McLuhan, Media, & the Ecology of the Digital Age in SALVO Magazine. Read the rest here: http://tinyurl.com/llzdteu ,


Categories: Blog

Marshall McLuhan, Media, & the Ecology of the Digital Age

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 06/07/2014 - 2:29pm

Marshall’s Media Ecologies

For four decades, Marshall McLuhan has been the Bob Dylan of the communication academy. In the late 1960s, Tom Wolfe entertained the thought that McLuhan might be “the most important thinker since Newton, Darwin, Freud, Einstein, and Pavlov . . . the most famous man his country ever produced.” Woody Allen gave him a cameo in the movie Annie HallWired magazine named him its “patron saint,” and bands from Genesis to Radio Free Vestibule have written him tributes. He is more than an intellectual; he is an icon. But Marshall McLuhan, who passed away in 1980, always seemed an unlikely candidate for oracular status.

Born in Alberta, Canada, in 1911, McLuhan was what every concerned father calls a “permanent student.” He received his first undergraduate degree from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg in 1933 and took ten years to get his Ph.D. He was a professor his entire professional life, a bookish man with a love for classic literature and an unholy affection for James Joyce’s treatise Finnegan’s Wake; but McLuhan was also Delphic—a prophet for the electronic age—and his aphoristic predictions transcended the academy to seize the imagination of the mainstream.

To oversimplify, McLuhan’s great insight was to see media in its broadest sense: as ecology. The word “medium” (from which “media” was derived), refers to “an intervening substance through which something else is transmitted or carried on.” And that’s the key. McLuhan’s claim was that the intervening substances we use—phonetic letters, radio broadcasts, YouTube videos, blogs, and whispers—are just as important as the messages they convey.

As McLuhan famously put it, the medium is the message; and if, as he claimed, all media are extensions of man, then we are not just the passive recipients of media but a critical part of media itself. This makes media an ecosystem—like a marsh, savannah, or swamp—that surrounds us, consumes us, and works us over in every imaginable way. McLuhan writes, “Environments are not passive wrappings, but are, rather, active processes which are invisible. The ground rules, pervasive structure, and overall patterns of environments elude easy perception.”

And the advent of electronic media in the twentieth century may be the biggest shock to that ecosystem in at least 500 years. McLuhan comments, “The new media are not ways of relating us to the old ‘real’ world; they are the real world and they reshape what remains of the old world at will.”

Whereas the printed word is just an extension of the eye, and the spoken word an extension of the ear, McLuhan claimed that electronic media are an extension of man’s central nervous system—all inclusive and limitless, interactive and multi-sensory. Their nature—light, electricity!—grants them power to impact not simply individual locales, but entire nations in real time, transforming the world from a mass of separate villages to one global village with shared experience and imagery.

Obviously, McLuhan’s volumes of work are too extensive and nuanced to treat comprehensively in one essay, but his basic analysis forces us to ask questions. What are our environments and their boundaries? How do we identify these complex interactions and view our ecosystem in new and interesting ways?

This is an extract from a longer essay titled Marshall McLuhan, Media, & the Ecology of the Digital Age in SALVO Magazine. Read the rest here: http://tinyurl.com/llzdteu ,


Categories: Blog

Loss of Privacy: Marshall McLuhan’s Warnings

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:54pm

big-data-eye

This is from a Letter to the Editor to one of the local newspapers:-

Heed McLuhan’s warnings Published on Fri May 30 2014

Re: Snowden: The gift that keeps on giving, May 24

With all the recent articles about CSEC and the NSA, I can no longer smugly blame the present day government(s) for this surveillance mess we’re in. While poking through Marshall McLuhan’s letters recently I found these revelations.

On April 14, 1969, McLuhan wrote to Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau: “Under electric conditions there can be no privacy. The privacy invaders are the bulwark of the new knowledge industries, from the pollsters, to the insurance companies, and the credit ratings, ‘the eye in the sky,’, the age of the ‘snoop’.”

Then on March 2, 1970, McLuhan wrote the following to the Office of the Prime Minister: “Any conventional bureaucracy becomes a police state when speeded up by a new technology such as telephone or telex.”

To illustrate his point McLuhan used the example of the conventional car “speeded up” giving rise to “the extreme instance of police state” via “helicopters and computers.”

On March 23, 1967, McLuhan wrote to his good friend John Wain [Oxford U scholar & author] about the effects of his own increasing public exposure: “When you go into the public domain by the media route everybody develops the illusion that they own you. They resent even slight efforts at privacy.”

In the near half century since McLuhan’s observations, human interaction has “speeded up,” rendering old-fashioned socializing and dating obsolete. We now find ourselves eagerly executing online surveillance of each other.

Perhaps we should all slow down and privately reflect on these ideas for a moment. Is that possible in this day and age? (Source: http://tinyurl.com/qevu6cr )

panopticon image


Categories: Blog

Loss of Privacy: Marshall McLuhan’s Warnings

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/03/2014 - 12:54pm

big-data-eye

This is from a Letter to the Editor to one of the local newspapers:-

Heed McLuhan’s warnings Published on Fri May 30 2014

Re: Snowden: The gift that keeps on giving, May 24

With all the recent articles about CSEC and the NSA, I can no longer smugly blame the present day government(s) for this surveillance mess we’re in. While poking through Marshall McLuhan’s letters recently I found these revelations.

On April 14, 1969, McLuhan wrote to Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau: “Under electric conditions there can be no privacy. The privacy invaders are the bulwark of the new knowledge industries, from the pollsters, to the insurance companies, and the credit ratings, ‘the eye in the sky,’, the age of the ‘snoop’.”

Then on March 2, 1970, McLuhan wrote the following to the Office of the Prime Minister: “Any conventional bureaucracy becomes a police state when speeded up by a new technology such as telephone or telex.”

To illustrate his point McLuhan used the example of the conventional car “speeded up” giving rise to “the extreme instance of police state” via “helicopters and computers.”

On March 23, 1967, McLuhan wrote to his good friend John Wain [Oxford U scholar & author] about the effects of his own increasing public exposure: “When you go into the public domain by the media route everybody develops the illusion that they own you. They resent even slight efforts at privacy.”

In the near half century since McLuhan’s observations, human interaction has “speeded up,” rendering old-fashioned socializing and dating obsolete. We now find ourselves eagerly executing online surveillance of each other.

Perhaps we should all slow down and privately reflect on these ideas for a moment. Is that possible in this day and age? (Source: http://tinyurl.com/qevu6cr )

panopticon image


Categories: Blog

Supernova Shines Light on Digital World

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 06/02/2014 - 6:18pm
Supernova shines light on digital world

Calgary’s Theatre Junction timed its presentation of Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova to coincide with the Festival TransAmériques. The bilingual work is “an investigation of our relationship with the digital world,” says director Mark Lawes. (Photograph by: Alexandre Mehring)

Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova is a bilingual work largely inspired by Marshall McLuhan

MONTREAL — Mark Lawes, artistic director of Calgary’s Theatre Junction, says his show is “an investigation of our relationship with the digital world.”

Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova is a bilingual work largely inspired by Marshall McLuhan, who is credited with anticipating the birth of the Internet. The setting is a sound stage for a B-movie, and the characters — isolated by technology — express themselves through dance, spoken word and video.

“Because we work in English and in French, we’re quite an anomaly in the West,” Lawes said.

It was Douglas Coupland’s recent biography of McLuhan that reconnected Lawes with the author who coined the phrase “global village.”

Another influence was the everyday life Lawes was sharing with his partner, Raphaële Thiriet, who lives in France. They rely heavily on Skype to communicate. She has collaborated with Lawes on this show, which took shape during a three-month residency in France before it premièred in Calgary in March 2013. That’s when a couple of artists from Montreal’s La Pire Espèce, one of the resident companies of Aux Écuries, saw it and expressed interest.

The idea is to present “a window to our work” while the FTA takes place, Lawes said. “We were in discussions with the festival,” he added, “but it ended up not happening.”

He has already planned a return visit for September, when Theatre Junction will be doing a three-week residency with a new show.

Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova was staged from Friday, May 30 at Théâtre Aux Écuries, 7285 Chabot St. Call 514-328-7437 or visit auxecuries.com. (Source http://tinyurl.com/ms6x3k3 )


Categories: Blog

Supernova Shines Light on Digital World

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 06/02/2014 - 6:18pm
Supernova shines light on digital world

Calgary’s Theatre Junction timed its presentation of Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova to coincide with the Festival TransAmériques. The bilingual work is “an investigation of our relationship with the digital world,” says director Mark Lawes. (Photograph by: Alexandre Mehring)

Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova is a bilingual work largely inspired by Marshall McLuhan

MONTREAL — Mark Lawes, artistic director of Calgary’s Theatre Junction, says his show is “an investigation of our relationship with the digital world.”

Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova is a bilingual work largely inspired by Marshall McLuhan, who is credited with anticipating the birth of the Internet. The setting is a sound stage for a B-movie, and the characters — isolated by technology — express themselves through dance, spoken word and video.

“Because we work in English and in French, we’re quite an anomaly in the West,” Lawes said.

It was Douglas Coupland’s recent biography of McLuhan that reconnected Lawes with the author who coined the phrase “global village.”

Another influence was the everyday life Lawes was sharing with his partner, Raphaële Thiriet, who lives in France. They rely heavily on Skype to communicate. She has collaborated with Lawes on this show, which took shape during a three-month residency in France before it premièred in Calgary in March 2013. That’s when a couple of artists from Montreal’s La Pire Espèce, one of the resident companies of Aux Écuries, saw it and expressed interest.

The idea is to present “a window to our work” while the FTA takes place, Lawes said. “We were in discussions with the festival,” he added, “but it ended up not happening.”

He has already planned a return visit for September, when Theatre Junction will be doing a three-week residency with a new show.

Sometime Between Now and When the Sun Goes Supernova was staged from Friday, May 30 at Théâtre Aux Écuries, 7285 Chabot St. Call 514-328-7437 or visit auxecuries.com. (Source http://tinyurl.com/ms6x3k3 )


Categories: Blog

Trapped Light, A Documentary Media Project by Natalie Logan, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 05/26/2014 - 11:41am
Cover Photo

MAY 29 Opening Reception: May 29th, 6-9 pm. Exhibition continues until June 11th. Opening Reception: May 29th, 6-9 pm. Exhibition continues until June 11th Luff art + dialogue, 688 Richmond Street West, #202. Gallery Hours: Wed-Sat, 1 – 5 pm, and by appointment. Trapped Light is a documentary media project featuring a series of holograms and an interactive laser installation, which invites us to reflect on the nature of light as we understand it – as a wave and a particle, as poiesis and science. Film Screening and Discussion on the Poetry of Physics with author and physicist Professor Robert K. Logan, PhD: June 11th, 6 – 9 pm. *****

Visible light, which represents only a tiny sliver within the electromagnetic spectrum, has been described in conflicting ways. According to quantum theory, it is experimental observation that causes light to manifest itself as either a particle or a wave. Thus, our current understanding of light introduces ambiguity to our notion of reality.

Trapped Light comprises a series of holograms and an interactive laser installation that explore our perception of and relationship to light and space. It seeks to visually express that which is not always perceptible to the naked eye, for which we need external media to represent that aspect of our reality. Holograms are created by wave interference from laser light, which is split between the object and the holographic emulsion. They allow us to see light frozen in time, representing the object without physical form. The laser installation, modelled after the Michelson Interferometer, projects a moving pattern of light caused by wave interference. It is affected by the smallest of movements, thus visually amplifying our own movement in the gallery space as an abstract light projection of dark and light fringes.

The interference seen in the laser projection and the figure-ground interaction, which takes place between the glass surface and the projected space of the holograms in Trapped Light, puts us in a paradoxical state where we can reflect on the nature of light as we understand it—as a wave and a particle, as poiesis and science. ( http://docnow.ca/artists/natalie-logan/ )

Artist Bio

Natalie Logan is an interdisciplinary artist who bridges her skills in various media to explore the subject of light. In addition to completing an Honours BA at the University of Toronto, she has studied with notable artists and collectives such as Paolo Soleri’s Arcosanti, Werner Herzog’s Rogue Film School, and the Photon League and Light Foundry holography labs. For the past three years, Natalie has been working with artists, designers and academics as a Research Assistant for OCAD University’s PHASE Lab as its primary holographer. She also works as a freelance photographer, cinematographer and editor. Some of her work can be seen at www.natagraphy.com .

Profile picture for luff art + dialogue
Categories: Blog

“The Acoustic-Unconscious: Recovering Marshall McLuhan” – Seminar in Ethnomusicology & Sound Studies with Veit Erlmann

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 05/25/2014 - 12:59pm

Although this seminar happened several days ago at the University of Oxford, I am posting it here because it underlines another academic area of influence that Marshall McLuhan has had, in this case, on sound studies, with his concept of  “acoustic space.”

Sounds Assembling by Bertram Brooker (1928)
Image from Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) Open to all  and admission is free 
Seminar in Ethnomusicology and Sound Studies        “The Acoustic-Unconscious: Recovering Marshall McLuhan Professor Veit Erlmann Endowed Chair of Music History, Professor of Ethnomusicology and Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin     Thursday 22nd, May 2014 (TT Week4)  (17:00-18:30)   –   Ertegun House, St Giles, University of Oxford

Abstract

Marshall McLuhan is considered to be a founding figure of sound studies, but he is also (in)famous for his techno-determinism, Orientalism and, most importantly, oral/literate dichotomy. By contrast, his concept of “acoustic space” is often overlooked. Erlmann argues that it is time to revisit McLuhan’s contribution to early sound studies and to examine the place of “acoustic space” in his theory of media. In so doing he hopes to broaden the current debate about sound on the edge or the “unsound” to what Erlmann calls the “acoustic-unconscious.” An short excerpt of McLuhan being interviewed in 1967 can be watched below. (Source: http://tinyurl.com/pk6flzp )

Biography (follow the above link to see the complete biography) Veit Erlmann holds the Endowed Chair of Music History at the University of Texas. He studied musicology, sociology, anthropology and philosophy in Berlin and Cologne, where he obtained a Dr.phil. in 1978 and did a Habilitation in musicology in 1989 and in anthropology in 1994. As an ethnographer he has done fieldwork in Morocco (1972), Cameroon (1975-1976), Niger (1979), South Africa (1982-1987), Lesotho (1982), Ecuador (1987), and Ghana (1989).  Currently he is working on a book on intellectual property in the South African music industry that will be published by Duke University Press. In addition to his ethnographic work he also retains a strong interest in musicology, cultural studies and cultural history, primarily in relation to Europe.
Categories: Blog

MZTV Museum of Television Opens in Liberty Village, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 05/24/2014 - 7:54pm

By Ed Conroy / MAY 23, 2014

Museum Television Toronto

Toronto’s own visionary prophet of the airwaves Moses Znaimer re-opened his Museum of Television yesterday, and now welcomes all curious and card carrying fans of the medium to visit this weekend as the MZTV Museumof Television & Archive participates in the citywide Door’s open program.

Not just content with pioneering and broadcasting his own unique brand of exalted content, Znaimer also digs the apparatus: his collection of vintage Television sets is a geeked-out heavenly shrine to the art of TV technology, from boxy postage stamp sized screens to hulking, Martian-like monstrosities on the likes of which our (great) grandparents witnessed the first human being walking on the moon.

Moses Znaimer

 The mandate of the MZTV Museum of Television and Archive is “to protect, preserve and promote the        receiving instruments of television history”, and with the largest collection of North American boob tubes  dating from the 1920s to the 1970s on display, a stroll down the aisles of the MZTV museum is guaranteed to  nuke your nostalgic synapses.

 As a learned student of communications philosopher Marshall McLuhan, Znaimer has long  been fascinated with the delivery system – “the Medium is the message!” – and iconography  showcasing classic TV sets can be found throughout his work, from the salad Citytv days  right up to his booming Zoomer empire.

 Highlights of the Museum include the truly alien RCA TRK-12 Phantom Teleceiver, “the rarest TV set on the  planet” from the 1939 New York World Fair. The guts on this beautiful unit were intentionally open and on  display to remove any doubt that magic might have been responsible for the live images it displayed – sort of like the Citypulse newsroom of the 70s, 80s and 90s.

TRK Television

WHERE : The ZoomerPlex, 64 Jefferson Avenue in Toronto’s Liberty Village (one block South of King Street)

Read the rest of this article and see photos of other rare TV sets, as well as videos of historic programming at http://tinyurl.com/lylts5p .

zoomer museum


Categories: Blog

Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies – Public Seminar – Friday, May 30, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 05/23/2014 - 5:37am

Work blog img

The Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) cordially invites media researchers, creative practitioners, and social activists to the second part of its public seminar series Moving Forward. The seminar offers an opportunity to connect through a Round table discussion, film screening, and exclusive performance on media, diversity issues, and silenced voices at Toronto’s industReal arts room (688 Richmond Street West) from 6 to 10 pm on Friday, May 30.  The evening opens with a reception honouring distinguishing participants Sylvia Fraser, Tushar Unadkat, Salvatore Greco, Mary Fantaske, Michael Sizer, and Heryka Miranda.

An award-winning novelist, a memoirist, a travel writer and a journalist from The Globe and Mail and Toronto Star, Sylvia Fraser has published a dozen books under her own name. She is probably best known for her 1987 international bestseller, My Father’s House: a Memoir of Incest and of Healing, credited as being one of the first to break the taboo on childhood sexual abuse. She has also written hundreds of magazine articles, for which she has won numerous awards, including the 2008 Matt Cohen A Writer’s Life Award for her body of work. She has taught creative writing at Banff Centre and various university workshops, and participated in extensive media tours across Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

Roundtable discussant Salvatore Greco has been an integral part of the Faculty of Communication and Design (FCAD) RTA School of Media at Ryerson University. His critical observations and insightful views on Rob Ford’s celebrity status and alternative use of tabloid formats set new grounds for social justice in media culture. Ryerson University’s Mary Fantaske reveals hidden truths in marginal representations of bodies and abilities. She is an activist and Masters student from the Department of Communication and Culture at Ryerson University. Filmmaker and activist Michael Sizer shows how the public can use citizen journalism and screens his ground-breaking film The Whole World is Watching after the Roundtable discussion. The Roundtable also includes internationally celebrated, awards winning media personality, Tushar Unadkat, holds a Master of Design from the University of Dundee, Scotland and Honors in Photography from University of Wolverhampton, England.  CEO and Creative Director of MUKTA Advertising, Unadkat is honoured with Canada’s Trailblazer award at the 12th Annual Reel World Film Festival then in 2012.

The event closes with a live performance titled Stepping Into Her Knowing by social change artist and holistic dance practitioner Heryka Miranda. Of Guatemalan-Mayan/ US American heritage, Heryka Miranda, gives a voice to the voiceless, subverts disabilities, and honours Indigenous communities and land defenders through accompaniment, activism and sacred ceremonies using the expressive dance arts. In 2013 she was the International Guest Fellow with the award-winning Dancing Earth Indigenous Contemporary Dance Company in Santa Fe, New Mexico and an ambassador of Limitless Productions that was recently featured among academics, artists and activists at the Feminist Art Conference (FAC). In August, Heryka begins her graduate studies in Dance/Movement Therapy and Mental Health Counseling at Lesley University in Cambridge, MA.

This series is hosted by Holly Larson and moderated by Samita Nandy. Featured on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and Rogers Television among many more, Nandy holds a PhD on fame from the School of Media, Culture and Creative Arts (MCCA) at Curtin University in Australia and is the Director of The Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS).

The Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies (CMCS) is an international non-profit organization with cross-disciplinary faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, and creative practitioners specializing in media literacy, critical studies of fame and celebrity activism. The centre facilitates academic and media partnerships with the aim of strengthening higher education and creative industries, and has been covered by Canada’s CTV National News in 2014.

Date: Friday, May 30 (6 – 9 pm)
Location
: industREALarts room (688 Richmond Street West) in Toronto, Canada
Admission: $10

For more information on the Centre for Media and Celebrity Studies and subscription, visit www.cmc-centre.com or contact Samita Nandy at info@cmc-centre.com or 416-985-8887.


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