Blog

Marshall McLuhan 103rd Birthday Luncheon, July 21st, St. Michael’s College, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 12:26pm

(Poster by Jana Jankovic, Emilie Charlebois, Julia Lefebvre & student helpers)

Dear Friends,

Monday, July 21 will be the 103rd anniversary of Marshall McLuhan’s birth. To mark the occasion, we are organizing an informal luncheon at St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto. 

This is an opportunity to reconnect with members of the McLuhan Legacy Network, which was started for the centenary celebrations of  2011; even if you weren’t a part of that group, but share an interest in the work and legacy of Marshall McLuhan, you are invited to attend. The luncheon will just be cafeteria food, in the Canada Room, which is the student cafeteria, and will cost you less than $10. The food is reasonable, essentially the same meals as are provided in St Mike’s faculty lunch room. The room might be a bit noisy, as the kids from St. Mike’s summer camp eat there as well. All other rooms were booked, but the catering facility has promised to place room dividers to dampen the sound. The kids will be gone by 1:30.

We will gather between 12: 30 and 12:45 to go through the cafeteria line and bring our trays to the very east end of the room, where there will be nine tables accommodating four persons each. We will eat in small groups of four and at 1:30 after the camp kids depart, we can have a group conversation. It is possible we might be able to visit the Coach House where McLuhan worked afterward. Dominique Scheffel-Dunand is trying to facilitate this with the iSchool.

As there are only 36 places, we can only guarantee a spot for lunch to the first 36 folks that RSVP to Bob Logan at logan@physics.utoronto.ca. Even if you can’t make it for lunch, feel free to join us after 1:30 for the conversation.

Follow this link to view a map showing the location of the Canada Room in Brennan Hall, which is immediately west of St. Basil’s Church (which is near the corner of Bay and St. Joseph Streets). The entrance to the Canada Room is at the southwest corner of Brennan Hall: https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.6665305,-79.3896374,18z .

   Brennan Hall

canadaroom   Canada Room


Categories: Blog

Quentin Fiore & The Medium is the Massage (1967)

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 07/13/2014 - 12:30pm

 

The hardcover edition (left image) followed the paperback, which was published by Bantam Books: A McLuhanesque turn of the screw.

By:  | October 18, 2012

Quentin Fiore designed and, with Marshall McLuhan, co-authored The Medium Is the Massage, an icon of the 1960s and required reading for everyone involved in what McLuhan dubbed the “electric age.” McLuhan was a philosopher and seer whose books—The Mechanical BrideThe Gutenberg GalaxyThe Making of Typographic Man, and Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man,—explored the evolution of technology and its effects on conscious and subconscious behavior. Revered by some, McLuhan was called a fake, a charlatan, and worse by critics who argued that his ideas were either simplistic, obtuse, silly, or contradictory. McLuhan argued that contradiction was an essential part of the contemporary condition and, moreover, that contradiction was a metaphor for television, a medium which allowed a person to ponder two or more ideas at one time.

To briefly state his theory, and thereby lay a foundation for Fiore’s graphic design, McLuhan believed that the invention of print and printing shattered community by allowing the oral tradition to become obsolete. He argued that writing and reading were solitary acts that adversely effected tribal unity, memory, and imagination. Electronic media, and television specifically, was destined to return us to a Global Village, allowing individuals to once again take an active role in the communications process. His mantra was “the medium is the message.” Media, he argued, are extensions of human activity (just as the wheel is an extension of the foot). Television, he said, allowed for greater individual participation. McLuhan, who believed that humor was paramount to conveying his message and was a passionate punster, said that electronics made “all the world a sage.” Marvin Kitman, who acerbically reviewed The Medium Is the Massage (the title is a double entendre on “mass age” and McLuhan’s notion that media are so pervasive that they work us over like a masseuse) referred to it as The Tedium Is the Message. At least at first, the criticisms of the book’s contents and visual presentation overwhelmed the praise.

But this should not eclipse the historic nature of Fiore’s work. The Medium Is the Massage was called the first book for the television age. The New York Times critic Eliot Freemont Smith said that the large format of the hardcover takes on “the aspect of a T.V. screen.” Fiore designed it as a kinetically flowing collection of word bites, iconic images, and clear and crisp typography. He underscored and highlighted McLuhan’s ideas with what amounts to a series of literary billboards, or what McLuhan impishly described as “collide-oscopic interfaced situations.” Read the full essay at http://tinyurl.com/lyzg756 .

Adapted from an essay in Design Literacy: Understanding Graphic Design (Allworth Press, 1997).

Steven Heller is the co-chair of the SVA MFA Designer /Designer as Author + Entrepreneur program, writes a weekly column for The Atlantic online and is the “Visuals” Columnist for the New York Times Book Review. He is also the author of over 160 books on design and visual culture. And he is the 2011 recipient of the Smithsonian National Design Award.


Categories: Blog

2014 Medium & Light Award Goes to Father John Pungente SJ, Media Educator

McLuhan Galaxy - Wed, 07/09/2014 - 12:01pm

Fr. John Pungente, S.J., with the Medium and Light Award presented to him by the Marshall McLuhan Initiative

Father John Pungente, S.J., with the Medium & Light Award presented to him by the Marshall McLuhan Initiative   (Photo courtesy of the Marshall McLuhan Initiative)

By Alex Kuskis, PhD

Father John Pungente, SJ was awarded the 2014 Medium and Light Award, which recognizes the religious dimensions of the life and work of Marshall McLuhan, for his work in religious communication and “longstanding dedication to media literacy. The award was announced at the recent MEA Convention at Ryerson University by Howard R. Engel, Director of the Marshall McLuhan Initiative at St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba. Mr. Engel commented: “His work for media literacy in the context of his own Ignatian spirituality bears eloquent testimony to finding God in all things, including the media.”

The inaugural award, in 2011, was presented to the late Father Pierre Babin, OMI (1925-2012), in Lyons, France, the 2012 award went to Dr. Thomas W. Cooper, Professor of Communication at Emerson College, Boston and Dr. Eric McLuhan was the recipient in 2013.

In a recent interview with the Catholic Register, Pungente called Marshall McLuhan a media genius and recalled learning from him when he was studying theology in Toronto. “His work was most influential in the development in the key concepts of media literacy, which I helped devise and which I used around the world in one form or another,” said Pungente. “I feel honoured in winning the award and being placed in the company of past winners like Pierre Babin and Eric McLuhan, Marshall’s son”. See interview at http://tinyurl.com/o5j8d2b .

John J. Pungente, SJ, has worked in media education for over 50 years. He has co-authored Media Literacy: A Resource Guide (1989), Meet the Media (1990), More than Meets the Eye: Watching TV Watching Us (1999) and Finding God in the Dark: The Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Go To The Movies (2004). He has contributed to international journals and books on media education. He has degrees in English, Film, and Theology as well as two honorary doctorates for his work in media education.

Pungente is creator and host of the award-winning Bravo! television show – SCANNING THE MOVIES - which premiered in 1997. He is producer of the award winning video A HEART TO UNDERSTAND, and the 1996 award winning teaching kit, SCANNING TELEVISION. SCANNING TELEVISION 2 (2003) has also received a number of awards.

Since 1985 he has given over 300 presentations across Canada and Australia, in Europe, Great Britain, the USA and Japan. He serves as a consultant to media professionals including CHUM Television and Warner Bros. Canada. Pungente is president of the Canadian Association of Media Education Organizations (CAMEO) and Director of the Jesuit Communication Project in Toronto where he continues to promote media education. (Source: http://tinyurl.com/pjjbz2k)

The Jesuit Communication Project: http://jcp.proscenia.net/

Eight Key Concepts for Media Literacy by John Pungente: http://tinyurl.com/ndz7tm2 

Medium&Light_AwardMedium & Light Award


Categories: Blog

The Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room, Rogers Communication Centre, Ryerson University, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 07/08/2014 - 2:06pm

Ryerson University used the occasion of the recent Media Ecology Association Convention (June 19-22) to publically commemorate their recently created Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room in their Rogers Communication Centre (RCC 202).  The room was named in honour of Marshall McLuhan’s association with Ryerson, which was known as Ryerson Institute of Technology when McLuhan knew it in the 1960s and ’70s. It was renamed Ryerson University in 2001. The ribbon cutting was done by Eric McLuhan, after welcoming comments by Academic Vice Provost Chris Evans, Dean Gerd Hauck and Emeritus Professor Donald Gillies (a onetime student of McLuhan). There will be more on Marshall McLuhan’s association with Ryerson in a later posting on this blog……….Alex

Here are some photographs of the Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room. Thanks to Sal Greco of Ryerson for providing them.

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room, Ryerson University

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room, Ryerson University

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room

The Ryerson Experiment, written by Marshall McLuhan, June 30, 1960. Find in The Critical Edition of "Understanding Media" (2003), Ed. by W. Terrence Gordon, published by Gingko Press (pp. 483-513).

The Ryerson Experiment, written by Marshall McLuhan, June 30, 1960. Find in The Critical Edition of “Understanding Media” (2003), Ed. by W. Terrence Gordon, published by Gingko Press (pp. 483-513).

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room, Display case

Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room, Display case


Categories: Blog

On Display at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, Toronto: Highlights from Marshall McLuhan’s Private Library

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 07/04/2014 - 7:58pm
Cover of Saturday Review with Marshall McLuhan on cover

This month, the Fisher’s rotating display case features books and materials from Marshall McLuhan’s Library. The library, comprising more than 6000 volumes, was used heavily by McLuhan in the writing of his most famous works, including Understanding MediaThe Gutenberg Galaxy and The Medium is the Massage.  A majority of the books bear McLuhan’s annotations and more than half of them contained material – including notes, manuscripts, and correspondence – laid into the books by McLuhan.

Fisher Librarian Jason Brown, who catalogued the McLuhan library (click on this link for the finding aid), has curated an exhibition featuring highlights from the library, including McLuhan’s heavily annotated copies of James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake. To listen to Jason discuss the McLuhan library, please click on this link or the sound icon below. He’s also provided an audio “guided tour” of the exhibition, which you can listen to by clicking on this link or on the sound icon below. (If you want to download the mp3 to your device, simply right click on the link.) Images from the display case can be seen below.

  McLuhan Library Overview

  McLuhan Display Case – Guided Tour

Click on images below for a closer view.

     

Source: http://fisher.library.utoronto.ca/mcluhan-library-display

Reading Room

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto


Categories: Blog

An Essay on The Mechanical Bride (1951)

McLuhan Galaxy - Thu, 07/03/2014 - 5:51pm

TWENTIETH-CENTURY VOX: MARSHALL MCLUHAN AND THE MECHANICAL BRIDE (9/2012)

All of which makes McLuhan’s first book, The Mechanical Bride: Folklore of Industrial Man, a study of advertising published by the distinguished independent house Vanguard Press in 1951, so strong a marker in his own story, and so captivating today: hilarious, threatening, inspiring, scary for the world it depicts and the solutions it seems to propose. By more than a decade, it anticipated both the spirit and the content of such media critiques as Guy Debord’s The Society of the Spectacle (1967), and for that matter the Rolling Stones’ 1965 hits “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Get Off of My Cloud”–not to mention Herbert Marcuse’s far less nimble Eros and Civilization (1955) and such works of pop sociology as Vance Packard’s once scandalizing The Hidden Persuaders (1957). For a book by a professor, let alone a first book, it could not be less academic. Even the Roland Barthes of Mythologies (1957), with whom the McLuhan of 1951 shares the most, is hesitant and circumscribed by comparison, and the later Buckminster Fuller, with the likes of Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1969) a by-the-numbers utopian.

In fifty-nine short essays, each one illustrated with a newspaper front page, a movie poster, a comic-strip panel, a lurid paperback cover, or, most often, an advertisement, and most often from a mass-circulation magazine such as LookReader’s Digest, or, preeminently, Life, McLuhan unwrites and rewrites what he is certain is the language of a new phase in human history:

No longer is it possible for modern man, individu­ally or collectively, to live in any exclusive segment of human experience or achieved social pattern. The modern mind, whether in its subconscious collective dream or in its intellectual citadel of vivid aware­ness, is a stage on which is contained and re-enacted the entire experience of the human race. There are no more remote and easy perspectives, either artistic or national. Everything is present in the foreground. That fact is stressed equally in current physics, jazz, newspapers, and psychoanalysis. And it is not a question of preference or taste. This flood has already immersed us. And whether it is to be a benign flood, cleansing the Augean stables of speech and experience, as envisaged in Joyce’s Finnegans Wake, or a merely destructive element, may to some extent depend on the degree of exertion and direc­tion which we elicit in ourselves. [3]

He is insisting on a great crisis, and insisting that it is new: “Ours is the first age in which many thousands of the best-trained individual minds have made it a full-time business to get inside the collective public mind. To get inside in order to manipulate, exploit, control is the object now. And to generate heat not light is the intention. To keep everybody in the helpless state engendered by prolonged mental rutting is the effect of many ads and much entertainment alike.” [4]

media critiques

McLuhan creates a sense of high stakes. It is no matter that he writes from Canada, because, really, he doesn’t: The US is his subject, the sea he swims in. Because the American mind is the modern mind, it is that mind that must be read. McLuhan generates such a sense of drama that the reader, or the looker, is pulled through his terrible puns (“from the cradle to the gravy,” “eager to sell their souls for a pot of message”), moments of sourness and fulminating raillery (“Time deals with its readers as a Sultan with his eunuchs”), phrases that sound as if they were clichés even before they were written (“these wondrous totalitarian techniques for mashing the public into processed cheese”), or what feels like irritation parading as judgment (“‘Democratic’ vanity has reached such proportions that it cannot accept as human anything above the level of cretinous confusion of mind of the type popularized by Hemingway’s heroes”). [5] Like any great critic, McLuhan here makes the reader feel as if he or she has embarked with the author on a great adventure. Never mind the readings of ads for long-defunct products in magazines that no longer exist: Whether merely sententious or as gripping as a thriller, hectoring or satiric, the book never reads as dated. And that’s partly because McLuhan, gearing up to slay the dragon of brainwashing, propaganda, and fascist-capitalist mind control, is having so much fun.

This is an excerpt. Read the full essay at http://tinyurl.com/pph6c7m .

GINGKO PRESS | MASS MEDIA / MARSHALL McLUHAN BOOK  The Mechanical Bride - Folklore of Industrial Man (1)

Marshall McLuhan: The Mechanical Bride
Folklore of Industrial Man
Can the feminine body keep pace with the demands of the textile industry? Are women’s legs getting longer? Is the sun cooling off?
Categories: Blog

Overview of the Recent Media Ecology Association 15th Annual Convention at Ryerson University, Toronto

McLuhan Galaxy - Wed, 07/02/2014 - 7:31pm

The statue of Egerton Ryerson, founder of the school system of Ontario, at Ryerson University, Toronto

By Alex Kuskis

For the first time in its history the MEA held its annual convention in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, downtown at Ryerson University, though this was the second time the event had been held in Canada; the University of Alberta in Edmonton hosted it in 2011, the year in which the centenary of McLuhan’s birth was celebrated. Of course Toronto is where McLuhan spent most of his professional career, from 1946 on, where he died in 1980, and where he is buried in the northern suburb of Thornhill.

The theme of this year’s convention was Confronting Technopoly: Creativity and the Creative Industries in Global Perspective, perhaps appropriately hosted by a university which, as Ryerson Institute of Technology, was established to prepare graduates for technological and creative careers. Secondary themes, in deference to the host city, dealt with the 50th anniversary of the publication of Understanding Media (1964) and the Toronto School of Communication.

Coordinated by Phil Rose of York University, with the support of Don Gillies, emeritus professor at Ryerson (and one time student of Marshall McLuhan), the standard MEA convention structure was used: 10 presentation sessions over three and a half days, each consisting of 3 or 4 concurrent offerings of usually 4 presenters, organized around media ecology themes. The usual difficulty of deciding which of the concurrent sessions to attend was especially strong.  Interspersed with these were a series of plenary sessions:

  • A panel on Understanding Media with the theme of Addressing Technological Trauma;
  • A lecture by Joshua Meyrowitz titled Snowed-In by Surveillance: Technopoly and the Social Reconstruction of Reality;
  • A panel on The Early Days of the Toronto School of Communication (1946-63), organized by Robert Logan;
  • A performance at the University of Toronto titled Lines of Thought, which might be described as a half dozen loosely connected neo-Platonic dialogues probing the interaction of technology and culture;
  • A panel on Technics and the Sacred, focused on the thought of Neil Postman, Jacques Ellul, George Grant, René Girard, Ernest Becker, Kenneth Burke;
  • A keynote lecture by Ron Deibert, Director of the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab at the Munk School of Global Affairs, on The Geopolitics of Cyberspace;

There was also a lunch time performance of a one-act-one-actor play written by Canadian author Rick Salutin about Harold Innis, titled Innis’s Foray. Ryerson University used this convention occasion to publically commemorate the Marshall McLuhan Seminar Room in their Rogers Communication Centre; the ribbon cutting was done by Eric McLuhan after welcoming comments by Dean Gerd Hauck and Donald Gillies. In a separate presentation on Friday evening, the Medium and the Light Award for religious communication was awarded to Father John Pungente, SJ for his longtime media literacy work by Howard Engel of the McLuhan Initiative of St. Paul’s College, University of Manitoba.

The final registration number of persons attending the conference was just under 200 registrants, which makes this one of the better attended MEA conventions. Onward to Denver, CO next year!


Categories: Blog

A Review of B.W. Powe’s Marshall McLuhan & Northrop Frye: Apocalypse & Alchemy

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/29/2014 - 12:24pm

   Philip Marchand | June 27, 2014 

One of the striking features of B.W. Powe’s 1981 A Climate Charged: Essays on Canadian Writers — signalling the arrival of a distinctive voice in Canadian criticism — was that author’s facility in combining erudite argument with the evocation of personality. In the 1981 book, for example, there are sharply observed portraits of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye.

Powe as novelist remains more or less in the background of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye: Apocalypse and Alchemy, but he does not disappear. Powe begins his study with a reference to the initial introduction of Frye and McLuhan at a meeting of the English Department of the University of Toronto in 1946, and then declares, “I like to imagine their first conversation.”

Throughout this work, Powe’s imagination helps to conjure McLuhan and Frye as solitary outlaws, to use a previous Powe term. The men had their different missions. McLuhan, the media guru, “wrote a detailed history of the technological future,” Powe observes. Frye, the consummate literary critic, “offered up the content of our imaginations.” To Frye, McLuhan was besotted by the electronic environment; to McLuhan, Frye was a library rat. But it is the argument of Powe’s book that the thought of both men was ultimately complementary and converging. “Their deepest concerns were how texts (of the world, of literary invention) make us and how we in turn make and receive more meaning,” Powe writes.

The undoubted difference between the two men in temperament, and their inevitable rivalry, was rubbed raw by differences in religion. McLuhan was a devout Catholic and Frye a heretical Protestant, but according to Powe, both were attuned to what Powe calls the Spirit — the pattern beyond all patterns, accessible to perceptive spiritual explorers.

Read the rest here: http://tinyurl.com/oj9pnex .

 Apocalypse and Alchemy


Categories: Blog

A Review of B.W. Powe’s Marshall McLuhan & Northrop Frye: Apocalypse & Alchemy

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/29/2014 - 12:24pm

   Philip Marchand | June 27, 2014 

One of the striking features of B.W. Powe’s 1981 A Climate Charged: Essays on Canadian Writers — signalling the arrival of a distinctive voice in Canadian criticism — was that author’s facility in combining erudite argument with the evocation of personality. In the 1981 book, for example, there are sharply observed portraits of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye.

Powe as novelist remains more or less in the background of Marshall McLuhan and Northrop Frye: Apocalypse and Alchemy, but he does not disappear. Powe begins his study with a reference to the initial introduction of Frye and McLuhan at a meeting of the English Department of the University of Toronto in 1946, and then declares, “I like to imagine their first conversation.”

Throughout this work, Powe’s imagination helps to conjure McLuhan and Frye as solitary outlaws, to use a previous Powe term. The men had their different missions. McLuhan, the media guru, “wrote a detailed history of the technological future,” Powe observes. Frye, the consummate literary critic, “offered up the content of our imaginations.” To Frye, McLuhan was besotted by the electronic environment; to McLuhan, Frye was a library rat. But it is the argument of Powe’s book that the thought of both men was ultimately complementary and converging. “Their deepest concerns were how texts (of the world, of literary invention) make us and how we in turn make and receive more meaning,” Powe writes.

The undoubted difference between the two men in temperament, and their inevitable rivalry, was rubbed raw by differences in religion. McLuhan was a devout Catholic and Frye a heretical Protestant, but according to Powe, both were attuned to what Powe calls the Spirit — the pattern beyond all patterns, accessible to perceptive spiritual explorers.

Read the rest here: http://tinyurl.com/oj9pnex .

 Apocalypse and Alchemy


Categories: Blog

Cheche Lazaro named as 2014 Marshall McLuhan fellow, Philippines

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 06/28/2014 - 10:51am

By , June 26, 2014

Veteran broadcast journalist Cheche Lazaro has been awarded the prestigious Marshall McLuhan Fellowship from the Canadian Embassy for her excellence in the media industry.

Cheche Lazaro receives her plaque as the 2014 Marshall McLuhan fellow from the Canadian Embassy’s Political and Economic Relations Counsellor James Christoff. Xianne Arcangel

Lazaro’s selection as the 18th McLuhan fellow was announced Thursday at the Jaime V. Ongpin Journalism seminar organized by the Center for Media Freedom and Democracy.

Philippine Daily Inquirer reporter Nancy Carvajal, who broke the story on the misuse of lawmakers’ Priority Development Assistance Fund last year, was chosen as the CMFR’s Outstanding Journalist of 2013. She was the first recipient of the award.

Canadian Embassy Political and Economic Relations Counsellor James Christoff, who presented the award, said Lazaro “[has a name] that is synonymous with excellence in the industry and exemplifies the best in the profession.”

“She has a long history of acclaimed journalistic work in various media platforms, a courageous approach in fleshing out the most important issues of the day, and a relentless thirst to share knowledge with her colleagues,” he said.

Lazaro is the founding president of Probe Productions Inc. She has worked as a reporter and producer of television programs such as “The Probe Team”, the youth-oriented educational show “5 and Up”, “Gameplan” and “Cheche Lazaro Presents” over her storied career spanning nearly three decades.

Among the accolades she has received are the KBP Golden Dove Awards, Gawad CCP para sa Telebisyon, University of the Philippines’ Gawad Plaridel, Catholic Mass Media Awards (Hall of Fame), and the Excellence in Broadcasting Award from the Philippine Movie Press Club.

Surpise recognition

Lazaro said she considers winning the award as a “pleasant surprise” since she thought the recognition was exclusively given to print journalists.

“Many people who have won the Marshall McLuhan award are [what I consider] ‘super journalists’ whom I admire,” she told GMA News Online.

The Marshall McLuhan Fellowship, named after the world-renowned Canadian communication scholar, is the Embassy of Canada’s flagship media advocacy initiative.

Launched in 1997 to encourage responsible journalism in the Philippines, the Fellowship underlines Canada’s belief that strong media is essential to a free and democratic society.

The fellowship consists of a two-week familiarization tour and lecture at Canadian media and academic organizations. The fellow will also be invited to give a lecture at select Philippine universities.

Other finalists for the award were Carvajal, PDI reporter Joey Gabieta, GMA Network reporter Steve Dailisan, Rappler.com news editor Miriam Grace Go and freelance journalist Jake Soriano.

Each of the finalists received a P20,000 honorarium. Carvajal received an additional P30,000 as part of her citation. KG/BM, GMA News (Source http://tinyurl.com/okyhxvl )


Categories: Blog

Cheche Lazaro named as 2014 Marshall McLuhan fellow, Philippines

McLuhan Galaxy - Sat, 06/28/2014 - 10:51am

By , June 26, 2014

Veteran broadcast journalist Cheche Lazaro has been awarded the prestigious Marshall McLuhan Fellowship from the Canadian Embassy for her excellence in the media industry.

Cheche Lazaro receives her plaque as the 2014 Marshall McLuhan fellow from the Canadian Embassy’s Political and Economic Relations Counsellor James Christoff. Xianne Arcangel

Lazaro’s selection as the 18th McLuhan fellow was announced Thursday at the Jaime V. Ongpin Journalism seminar organized by the Center for Media Freedom and Democracy.

Philippine Daily Inquirer reporter Nancy Carvajal, who broke the story on the misuse of lawmakers’ Priority Development Assistance Fund last year, was chosen as the CMFR’s Outstanding Journalist of 2013. She was the first recipient of the award.

Canadian Embassy Political and Economic Relations Counsellor James Christoff, who presented the award, said Lazaro “[has a name] that is synonymous with excellence in the industry and exemplifies the best in the profession.”

“She has a long history of acclaimed journalistic work in various media platforms, a courageous approach in fleshing out the most important issues of the day, and a relentless thirst to share knowledge with her colleagues,” he said.

Lazaro is the founding president of Probe Productions Inc. She has worked as a reporter and producer of television programs such as “The Probe Team”, the youth-oriented educational show “5 and Up”, “Gameplan” and “Cheche Lazaro Presents” over her storied career spanning nearly three decades.

Among the accolades she has received are the KBP Golden Dove Awards, Gawad CCP para sa Telebisyon, University of the Philippines’ Gawad Plaridel, Catholic Mass Media Awards (Hall of Fame), and the Excellence in Broadcasting Award from the Philippine Movie Press Club.

Surpise recognition

Lazaro said she considers winning the award as a “pleasant surprise” since she thought the recognition was exclusively given to print journalists.

“Many people who have won the Marshall McLuhan award are [what I consider] ‘super journalists’ whom I admire,” she told GMA News Online.

The Marshall McLuhan Fellowship, named after the world-renowned Canadian communication scholar, is the Embassy of Canada’s flagship media advocacy initiative.

Launched in 1997 to encourage responsible journalism in the Philippines, the Fellowship underlines Canada’s belief that strong media is essential to a free and democratic society.

The fellowship consists of a two-week familiarization tour and lecture at Canadian media and academic organizations. The fellow will also be invited to give a lecture at select Philippine universities.

Other finalists for the award were Carvajal, PDI reporter Joey Gabieta, GMA Network reporter Steve Dailisan, Rappler.com news editor Miriam Grace Go and freelance journalist Jake Soriano.

Each of the finalists received a P20,000 honorarium. Carvajal received an additional P30,000 as part of her citation. KG/BM, GMA News (Source http://tinyurl.com/okyhxvl )


Categories: Blog

Harold Innis: From Staples Thesis to Communication Studies

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 06/27/2014 - 10:44am

COURTESY OF U OF T ARCHIVES B1972-0003/034(01) 0003

Harold Innis (1894-1952)canoeing on the Peace River, 1924

Harold Innis’s fur trade research in the summer of 1924 launched a celebrated academic career

By Susan Pedwell

When Harold Innis set off to explore the history of the fur trade in Alberta’s Peace River basin, he was limping from a shrapnel wound that had ripped open his leg at Vimy Ridge. But by the time the junior assistant professor returned to U of T, he was able to throw away his cane.

A summer in the northern hinterland did more than restore Innis’s health. It prompted the political economist to give Canadians a new vision of their country. Then, our jagged landscape was seen as an obstacle to overcome. Innis countered that Canada developed because of its geography, not in spite of it.

In his “staples thesis,” he argued that Canada’s exports of fur, timber, fish, fossil fuels and other commodities shaped its cultural and political development. Innis was the first to point out that Canada’s economic reliance on producing raw materials made it vulnerable to the whims of Britain, the U.S. and other manufacturing nations.

In his long career, Innis also wrote seminal books on communication, inspiring Marshall McLuhan to the point that McLuhan became his intellectual disciple.

This year, Innis College, U of T’s only college to be named after a scholar, is celebrating its 50th anniversary by honouring its namesake. One event planned for November will feature communication theorists who, as Innis did, have a vision to share. Janet Paterson, the college’s principal, points out that many of Innis’s programs continue to further the scholar’s legacy. “The college reflects some of Harold Innis’s far-reaching ideas on communication with its vibrant programs in film, writing and rhetoric, and urban studies.” (Source: http://tinyurl.com/lz56ybk )

On January 23, 1964, the University of Toronto’s Board of Governors (now known as Governing Council) approved the creation of a new college to be named after the distinguished Canadian scholar Harold Adams Innis. Innis College opened its doors to its first undergraduate class of about 250 students in September 1964.


Categories: Blog

Harold Innis: From Staples Thesis to Communication Studies

McLuhan Galaxy - Fri, 06/27/2014 - 10:44am

COURTESY OF U OF T ARCHIVES B1972-0003/034(01) 0003

Harold Innis (1894-1952)canoeing on the Peace River, 1924

Harold Innis’s fur trade research in the summer of 1924 launched a celebrated academic career

By Susan Pedwell

When Harold Innis set off to explore the history of the fur trade in Alberta’s Peace River basin, he was limping from a shrapnel wound that had ripped open his leg at Vimy Ridge. But by the time the junior assistant professor returned to U of T, he was able to throw away his cane.

A summer in the northern hinterland did more than restore Innis’s health. It prompted the political economist to give Canadians a new vision of their country. Then, our jagged landscape was seen as an obstacle to overcome. Innis countered that Canada developed because of its geography, not in spite of it.

In his “staples thesis,” he argued that Canada’s exports of fur, timber, fish, fossil fuels and other commodities shaped its cultural and political development. Innis was the first to point out that Canada’s economic reliance on producing raw materials made it vulnerable to the whims of Britain, the U.S. and other manufacturing nations.

In his long career, Innis also wrote seminal books on communication, inspiring Marshall McLuhan to the point that McLuhan became his intellectual disciple.

This year, Innis College, U of T’s only college to be named after a scholar, is celebrating its 50th anniversary by honouring its namesake. One event planned for November will feature communication theorists who, as Innis did, have a vision to share. Janet Paterson, the college’s principal, points out that many of Innis’s programs continue to further the scholar’s legacy. “The college reflects some of Harold Innis’s far-reaching ideas on communication with its vibrant programs in film, writing and rhetoric, and urban studies.” (Source: http://tinyurl.com/lz56ybk )

On January 23, 1964, the University of Toronto’s Board of Governors (now known as Governing Council) approved the creation of a new college to be named after the distinguished Canadian scholar Harold Adams Innis. Innis College opened its doors to its first undergraduate class of about 250 students in September 1964.


Categories: Blog

Digital Teens

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 11:40am

Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School

Marshall McLuhan CSS

This article purports to be about teenagers after Marshall McLuhan died, which was in 1980. More accurately, it focuses on Canadian students attending a Toronto Catholic high school named after Marshall McLuhan that exists in an affluent middle class neighborhood in one of the most multicultural large cities in North America. Although some non-Catholics are admitted under certain conditions, the faith-based approach to education, mandatory school uniforms and curriculum informed by Catholic religious and social beliefs, is only partially representative of teenagers today.

The Teenager, After McLuhan LINDA BESNER JUNE 16, 2014 Marshall McLuhan—whose Understanding Media turns 50 this year—described how media shaped the evolution of the teenager. What about teenagers these days? At Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School in Toronto, the student body is addressed as “Marshall.” Marshall cheers its rugby team, the Rebels, and does community service through clubs with names like “Grooving with the Seniors.” Marshall comes to school dressed in a uniform of black and white, the colours of print on paper.

On Marshall’s website, the administration declares its intention to train students to follow the example of the school’s namesake—to be vessels of revelation. “As Marshall McLuhan did, we strive to embody the highest goals of the Catholic intellectual tradition using our faith to understand our search for oneness, goodness and truth.” Like McLuhan, the students of MSCSS will learn to look beyond the immediate present to see the deep patterns that will shape our future. “Our students’ voices will be prophetic ones in the 21st century.”

McLuhan saw the teenager of the 1960s as a new kind of person. Before television, McLuhan said, there was adolescence—a period in which young people waited on the outskirts of the adult world for their real lives to start. But teenagers were living their real lives already, and their experience was the embodiment of both humanity’s future and its past.

Back then, it seemed as if teenagers could change the course of history. New ideas about civil rights, sexual liberation, and non-traditional lifestyles were threatening to upend society. Part of their power was economic; young people in the 1960s could walk out of high school into well paying jobs, or, should they choose, get a relatively cheap university education. But Marshall believed the change in communications technologies was leading to a generation of retribalized, collectivized, globalized citizens. In 1969, he told Playboy, “Our teenage generation is already becoming part of a jungle clan” … 

Some contemporary commentators have interpreted his remarks to predict an increasingly segmented, fragmented society made up of tiny factions which alternately war with or ignore each other. But others (the administration of Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School seemingly among them) saw McLuhan’s idea of a “tribal” global culture as an expression of the unity—the oneness—of humanity. If print had created the individual—people immersed themselves, alone, in books—television was breaking down the individual and rejoining humanity into one pulsating mass of awareness. Teenagers would inherit a collective inner world shaped by global factors. Everyone would be connected. Read the rest of the article at http://tinyurl.com/mr95s8f .

The homepage of Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School is http://tinyurl.com/mm5u86l 

Marshall McLuhan Logo

Some articles about the Digital or Net generation:-

The Net Generation Goes to College - http://tinyurl.com/ll3b8zw

Teens and Technology 2013 - http://tinyurl.com/pkdsqv3

Busting the myth of tech-savvy youth - http://tinyurl.com/l7qbwc5


Categories: Blog

Digital Teens

McLuhan Galaxy - Mon, 06/23/2014 - 11:40am

Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School

Marshall McLuhan CSS

This article purports to be about teenagers after Marshall McLuhan died, which was in 1980. More accurately, it focuses on Canadian students attending a Toronto Catholic high school named after Marshall McLuhan that exists in an affluent middle class neighborhood in one of the most multicultural large cities in North America. Although some non-Catholics are admitted under certain conditions, the faith-based approach to education, mandatory school uniforms and curriculum informed by Catholic religious and social beliefs, is only partially representative of teenagers today.

The Teenager, After McLuhan LINDA BESNER JUNE 16, 2014 Marshall McLuhan—whose Understanding Media turns 50 this year—described how media shaped the evolution of the teenager. What about teenagers these days? At Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School in Toronto, the student body is addressed as “Marshall.” Marshall cheers its rugby team, the Rebels, and does community service through clubs with names like “Grooving with the Seniors.” Marshall comes to school dressed in a uniform of black and white, the colours of print on paper.

On Marshall’s website, the administration declares its intention to train students to follow the example of the school’s namesake—to be vessels of revelation. “As Marshall McLuhan did, we strive to embody the highest goals of the Catholic intellectual tradition using our faith to understand our search for oneness, goodness and truth.” Like McLuhan, the students of MSCSS will learn to look beyond the immediate present to see the deep patterns that will shape our future. “Our students’ voices will be prophetic ones in the 21st century.”

McLuhan saw the teenager of the 1960s as a new kind of person. Before television, McLuhan said, there was adolescence—a period in which young people waited on the outskirts of the adult world for their real lives to start. But teenagers were living their real lives already, and their experience was the embodiment of both humanity’s future and its past.

Back then, it seemed as if teenagers could change the course of history. New ideas about civil rights, sexual liberation, and non-traditional lifestyles were threatening to upend society. Part of their power was economic; young people in the 1960s could walk out of high school into well paying jobs, or, should they choose, get a relatively cheap university education. But Marshall believed the change in communications technologies was leading to a generation of retribalized, collectivized, globalized citizens. In 1969, he told Playboy, “Our teenage generation is already becoming part of a jungle clan” … 

Some contemporary commentators have interpreted his remarks to predict an increasingly segmented, fragmented society made up of tiny factions which alternately war with or ignore each other. But others (the administration of Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School seemingly among them) saw McLuhan’s idea of a “tribal” global culture as an expression of the unity—the oneness—of humanity. If print had created the individual—people immersed themselves, alone, in books—television was breaking down the individual and rejoining humanity into one pulsating mass of awareness. Teenagers would inherit a collective inner world shaped by global factors. Everyone would be connected. Read the rest of the article at http://tinyurl.com/mr95s8f .

The homepage of Marshall McLuhan Catholic Secondary School is http://tinyurl.com/mm5u86l 

Marshall McLuhan Logo

Some articles about the Digital or Net generation:-

The Net Generation Goes to College - http://tinyurl.com/ll3b8zw

Teens and Technology 2013 - http://tinyurl.com/pkdsqv3

Busting the myth of tech-savvy youth - http://tinyurl.com/l7qbwc5


Categories: Blog

Ryerson University hosts Media Ecology Association’s 15th Annual Convention

McLuhan Galaxy - Wed, 06/18/2014 - 10:32am
Ryerson Campus

International conference to explore role of cultural and creative industries in a techno-centric society

 June 17, 2014

On Thursday June 19, Ryerson University will host the Media Ecology Association’s annual convention, a first in Toronto. The four day convention,Confronting Technopoly: Creativity and the Creative Industries in Global Perspective, will probe how creativity and the cultural or creative industries might evolve in relation to technology. Conference highlights include:

Keynote Speaker – Ronald J. Deibert
Paul Kennedy, longtime host of CBC radio’s IDEAS will introduce keynote speaker Ronald J. Deibert, an expert on issues related to technology, media, and world politics who will give a talk entitled “The Geopolitics of Cyberspace.”  – Saturday, June 21, 4:15 p.m., Ryerson Library

Commemoration and Reception – Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan’s commitment to Ryerson and influential work in Understanding Media will be honored with a formal room dedication and commemoration, with remarks Donald J. Gillies and Eric McLuhan. — Thursday, June 19, 5:30 p.m., Rogers Communications Centre, 80 Gould Street

Performance  - Innis’s Foray
Award-winning actor Eric Peterson will play the title character in this one act play by novelist, playwright and journalist, Rick Salutin. — Friday, June 20, 12:15 p.m., Ryerson Library

A full program listing can be found at http://www.media-ecology.org/activities/index.html

WHAT: Fifteenth Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association:
Confronting Technopoly: Creativity & the Creative Industries in Global Perspective WHEN: Thursday, June 19 – Sunday, June 22, 2014 WHERE:  Ryerson University, Toronto, ON

Crest

Mente et Artificio (With Mind and Skill)


Categories: Blog

Ryerson University hosts Media Ecology Association’s 15th Annual Convention

McLuhan Galaxy - Wed, 06/18/2014 - 10:32am
Ryerson Campus

International conference to explore role of cultural and creative industries in a techno-centric society

 June 17, 2014

On Thursday June 19, Ryerson University will host the Media Ecology Association’s annual convention, a first in Toronto. The four day convention,Confronting Technopoly: Creativity and the Creative Industries in Global Perspective, will probe how creativity and the cultural or creative industries might evolve in relation to technology. Conference highlights include:

Keynote Speaker – Ronald J. Deibert
Paul Kennedy, longtime host of CBC radio’s IDEAS will introduce keynote speaker Ronald J. Deibert, an expert on issues related to technology, media, and world politics who will give a talk entitled “The Geopolitics of Cyberspace.”  – Saturday, June 21, 4:15 p.m., Ryerson Library

Commemoration and Reception – Marshall McLuhan
Marshall McLuhan’s commitment to Ryerson and influential work in Understanding Media will be honored with a formal room dedication and commemoration, with remarks Donald J. Gillies and Eric McLuhan. — Thursday, June 19, 5:30 p.m., Rogers Communications Centre, 80 Gould Street

Performance  - Innis’s Foray
Award-winning actor Eric Peterson will play the title character in this one act play by novelist, playwright and journalist, Rick Salutin. — Friday, June 20, 12:15 p.m., Ryerson Library

A full program listing can be found at http://www.media-ecology.org/activities/index.html

WHAT: Fifteenth Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association:
Confronting Technopoly: Creativity & the Creative Industries in Global Perspective WHEN: Thursday, June 19 – Sunday, June 22, 2014 WHERE:  Ryerson University, Toronto, ON

Crest

Mente et Artificio (With Mind and Skill)


Categories: Blog

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/17/2014 - 7:55pm

On the eve of our Media Ecology Association convention in Toronto, here’s a timely NY Times Sunday Book Review piece addressing a fundamental media ecology concern……..Alex

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

JUNE 17, 2014

 Each week in Bookends, two writers take on questions about the world of books. Fifty years ago, Marshall McLuhan suggested that the electronic image had supplanted the written word. This week, Dana Stevens and Rivka Galchen discuss whether we are living in a new revolutionary age, or just a continuation of the old one.

By Dana Stevens

What would the creator of the phrase “global village” have to say about its current incarnation, the Internet?

To read “Understanding Media” in 2014 is to wish McLuhan, who died in 1980 at the age of 69, were still available in theater lobbies for consultation. The book is a structural maze whose repetitiveness, rhetorical vagueness and propensity for brazen self-contradiction will drive your inner editor to contemplate rash acts. But flashing out of the murk at regular intervals are aphoristic bursts of uncannily prescient wisdom about the history and future of the various technologies of human communication — what McLuhan refers to in the book’s subtitle as “the extensions of man.” After a while you get accustomed to the terrain of McLuhan’s mind — a place of dizzying shifts and precipitous drops, crammed to bursting with false etymologies and weirdly inapposite literary references, where making sense is less important than making big, bold connections. “The electric light is pure information.” “Print technology transformed the medieval zero into the Renaissance infinity.” “Einstein pronounced the doom of continuous or ‘rational’ space, and the way was made clear for Picasso and the Marx Brothers and Mad.” These sweeping, oracular pronouncements don’t always lend themselves to paraphrase or rational explanation. Rather, they function as invitations to readers to use these ideas as tools in their own thinking about media, which perhaps explains why McLuhan later called his mantra-like formulations “probes.”

By Rivka Galchen

The written word is dying. Even if it never entirely expires, other mediums of expression are consuming the limited oxygen.

 The written word has been dying for so long!!! Exclamation points have finally revealed themselves as the sleeper cells of Image?! Image, which is so much better at getting us to buy something? You’ve read this argument before. Then we say that kids these days, they never read — they never read! — or, kids these days, they heart reading, and their tweets are Wildean epigrams, and Kanye West is a god of language . . . although that’s not written language, it’s . . . sometimes we get lost, it’s difficult to stay on point in conversation, especially because a terrible death blow was dealt to conversation, by literacy. It’s true, literacy has made conversational dum-dums of us all. Look at how witty the dialogue is in Shakespeare . . . most everybody back then could follow that sort of thing . . . and now we can’t, not only because we don’t speak Elizabethan English, but because we spend so much time reading . . . time that could be spent conversing, bantering . . . and that’s why the Elizabethans could have nuanced merry wars and everyone could follow and think up quick wordplay responses, because back then, talking was most all there was for most people to do . . . so we were better at it.

Those are two out of context quotes. Read the full article at http://tinyurl.com/okhnrap  .


Categories: Blog

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

McLuhan Galaxy - Tue, 06/17/2014 - 7:55pm

On the eve of our Media Ecology Association convention in Toronto, here’s a timely NY Times Sunday Book Review piece addressing a fundamental media ecology concern……..Alex

Has the Electronic Image Supplanted the Written Word?

JUNE 17, 2014

 Each week in Bookends, two writers take on questions about the world of books. Fifty years ago, Marshall McLuhan suggested that the electronic image had supplanted the written word. This week, Dana Stevens and Rivka Galchen discuss whether we are living in a new revolutionary age, or just a continuation of the old one.

By Dana Stevens

What would the creator of the phrase “global village” have to say about its current incarnation, the Internet?

To read “Understanding Media” in 2014 is to wish McLuhan, who died in 1980 at the age of 69, were still available in theater lobbies for consultation. The book is a structural maze whose repetitiveness, rhetorical vagueness and propensity for brazen self-contradiction will drive your inner editor to contemplate rash acts. But flashing out of the murk at regular intervals are aphoristic bursts of uncannily prescient wisdom about the history and future of the various technologies of human communication — what McLuhan refers to in the book’s subtitle as “the extensions of man.” After a while you get accustomed to the terrain of McLuhan’s mind — a place of dizzying shifts and precipitous drops, crammed to bursting with false etymologies and weirdly inapposite literary references, where making sense is less important than making big, bold connections. “The electric light is pure information.” “Print technology transformed the medieval zero into the Renaissance infinity.” “Einstein pronounced the doom of continuous or ‘rational’ space, and the way was made clear for Picasso and the Marx Brothers and Mad.” These sweeping, oracular pronouncements don’t always lend themselves to paraphrase or rational explanation. Rather, they function as invitations to readers to use these ideas as tools in their own thinking about media, which perhaps explains why McLuhan later called his mantra-like formulations “probes.”

By Rivka Galchen

The written word is dying. Even if it never entirely expires, other mediums of expression are consuming the limited oxygen.

 The written word has been dying for so long!!! Exclamation points have finally revealed themselves as the sleeper cells of Image?! Image, which is so much better at getting us to buy something? You’ve read this argument before. Then we say that kids these days, they never read — they never read! — or, kids these days, they heart reading, and their tweets are Wildean epigrams, and Kanye West is a god of language . . . although that’s not written language, it’s . . . sometimes we get lost, it’s difficult to stay on point in conversation, especially because a terrible death blow was dealt to conversation, by literacy. It’s true, literacy has made conversational dum-dums of us all. Look at how witty the dialogue is in Shakespeare . . . most everybody back then could follow that sort of thing . . . and now we can’t, not only because we don’t speak Elizabethan English, but because we spend so much time reading . . . time that could be spent conversing, bantering . . . and that’s why the Elizabethans could have nuanced merry wars and everyone could follow and think up quick wordplay responses, because back then, talking was most all there was for most people to do . . . so we were better at it.

Those are two out of context quotes. Read the full article at http://tinyurl.com/okhnrap  .


Categories: Blog

Erik Davis on Acoustic Cyberspace

McLuhan Galaxy - Sun, 06/15/2014 - 7:58pm

Davis erik 2008 rauner michael.jpg Erik Davis

A talk delivered at the Xchange conference, Riga, Latvia, November 1997

Today I’d like to talk about some abstract ideas, some images, some open-ended notions about acoustic space. In particular, I am interested in the relationship between electronic sound and environments, on the Internet or in music. I won’t talk about the various technologies involved; instead, I’ll try to get at some of the deeper issues about sound and the ways it constructs subjectivities and can act as a kind of map.

A good place to start is with a distinction that Marshall McLuhan draws between visual space and acoustic space. McLuhan used the notion of visual space as a way to describe how Western subjectivity has been organized on a technical basis since the Renaissance. McLuhan argued that Renaissance perspective not only provided a powerful new way of organizing the visual field (in terms of representation), but also engendered a very specific form of subjectivity. He didn’t just associate this subjectivity with the point-of-view produced by Renaissance perspective painting—he related to it also to print technologies and to the new form of the book. In essence, he argued that the self that comes down to us from the Renaissance—the “molar” self of the modern West, as some have called it—is a visual self.

Renaissance perspective thus serves as a pictorial analogy for a much more general phenomenon—the power to create a distinct, single point of view that organizes thought and perception along linear lines. This is related to print technologies—and print culture—because, according to McLuhan, these technologies inculcate within us a habit of organizing the world in a linear, atomized, and sequential fashion. Central to this visual space is the axiom or assumption that “different” objects, vectors, or points are not and cannot be superimposed; instead, the world is perceived as a linear grid organized along strictly causal lines.

McLuhan contrasts this construction of visual space, and the kind of subjectivity associated with it, with what he calls “acoustic space.” Acoustic space is the space we hear rather than the space we see, and he argued that electronic media were submerging us in this acoustic environment, with its own language of affect and subjectivity. Acoustic space isn’t limited to a world of music or sound; the environment of electronic media itself engenders this way of organizing and perceiving the other spaces we intersect. (Read the rest of this essay at http://www.techgnosis.com/acoustic.html ).

Erik Davis is the author of Techgnosis: Myth, magic + mysticism in the age of information: http://techgnosis.com/techgnosis/techgnosis.html

 Read more about him here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_Davis .

Visual versus Acoustic Space. Source: Gordon A. Gow, “Spatial Metaphor in the Work of Marshall McLuhan,” 75


Categories: Blog
Syndicate content